Bitcoin Taxes in 2019: A Guide to Tax Rules for

NiceHash - buy & sell hashing power

NiceHash offers you to buy or sell hashing power directly, no contracts, no limitations, pay-as-you-go if you're a buyer and be-paid-as-you-go if you're a seller. Why bother renting rigs, when you can rent hashing power? NiceHash brings more to renters and rig owners. Visit https://www.nicehash.com today! Simply create order and you are already mining your favorite coin or point your rig to our stratum server and you are already earning bitcoins.
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07-25 06:23 - 'DO YOU HAVE TO PAY TAXES ON EVERY SINGLE TRADE REGARDLESS OF PROFIT/LOSSES.' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/sugardaddy1269420 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 215-225min

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IM IN THE US BTW
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DO YOU HAVE TO PAY TAXES ON EVERY SINGLE TRADE REGARDLESS OF PROFIT/LOSSES.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: sugardaddy1269420
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

how can you securely trade bitcoins into USD? Do people link their checking account? And does the bank report it to the IRS and you have to pay tax on it?

submitted by tricep6 to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

UK tax - if initial winnings are gambling profit do you pay a trading tax on winnings that rise in value? /r/Bitcoin

UK tax - if initial winnings are gambling profit do you pay a trading tax on winnings that rise in value? /Bitcoin submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

how can you securely trade bitcoins into USD? Do people link their checking account? And does the bank report it to the IRS and you have to pay tax on it? /r/BitcoinMarkets

how can you securely trade bitcoins into USD? Do people link their checking account? And does the bank report it to the IRS and you have to pay tax on it? /BitcoinMarkets submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why is Crypto Taxation in Canada so obscure?

I have so many questions about crypto taxes in Canada..
It's my first year in the country (6 months in) and when I was trading I didn't realize the country had such complex rules about crypto taxes, and then I realized every single transaction or trade I've made is a taxable event. So come 2021 when I need to file taxes, what do I do? Do I use an app like Koinly and pay $99 a year to automate the process? Because I've already unknowingly made up to 200 transactions across different exchanges which are going to be hard to track and I'm sure a 45 year old accountant isn't going to go through my Cardano and Tezos transactions.
If I've made a capital loss I'm assuming I don't have to pay anything right? but what if I've invested in some ICO on an exchange that's not even public yet and the coin itself isn't' publicly traded yet, meaning apps like Koinly wouldn't even recognize it to be able to access and record the transaction, then what? What if I sent it straight from an unknown exchange to a hardware wallet in another country. Who would know?
And finally how do I differentiate what is a capital gain tax and what is 'regular trading' tax, because yes I've done trading as opposed to just buying Bitcoin and holding it, because in some cases for unpopular coins you need to buy BTC first and then trade it for the other coin. That's 4 transactions already, so does it not qualify as capital gains just because some exchanges have certain coins and some don't? In the US if you hold an asset for over a year then it's a long term investment, but why are rules so obscure in Canada? Even the CRA website says its a 'case by case' situation, feels like it only makes room for them to audit you how they see fit.
What is the best way to make sure I'm doing things the right way and protecting myself? because all my research and from whatever is on the government website, it all points to grey areas. I'm fine with paying taxes, but I don't want to overpay because of a wrong assessment or interpretation, or because an app couldn't recognize a certain transaction, and definitely don't want to be audited because of something that has not enough clarity around it.
submitted by NotSerenaWilliams to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

The next XVG? Microcap 100x potential actually supported by fundamentals!

What’s up team? I have a hot one for you. XVG returned 12 million percent in 2017 and this one reminds me a lot of it. Here’s why:
Mimblewimble is like Blu-Ray compared to CD-ROM in terms of its ability to compress data on a blockchain. The current BTC chain is 277gb and its capacity is limited because every time you spend a coin, each node needs to validate its history back to when it was mined (this is how double spending is prevented). Mimblewimble is different - all transactions in a block are aggregated and netted out in one giant CoinJoin, and only the current spending needs to be verified. This means that dramatically more transactions can fit into a smaller space, increasing throughput and lowering fees while still retaining the full proof of work game theory of Bitcoin. These blockchains are small enough to run a full node on a cheap smartphone, which enhances the decentralization and censorship resistance of the network.
The biggest benefit, though, is that all transactions are private - the blockchain doesn’t reveal amounts or addresses except to the actual wallet owner. Unlike earlier decoy-based approaches that bloat the chain and can still be data mined (XMR), Mimblewimble leaves no trace in the blockchain, instead storing only the present state of coin ownership.
The first two Mimblewimble coins, Grin and Beam, launched to great fanfare in 2019, quickly reaching over $100m in market cap (since settled down to $22m and $26m respectively). They are good projects but grin has infinite supply and huge never-decreasing emission, and Beam is a corporate moneygrab whose founding investors are counting on you buying for their ROI.
ZEC is valued at $568m today, despite the facts that only 1% of transactions are actually shielded, it has a trusted setup, and generating a confidential transaction takes ~60 seconds on a powerful PC. XMR is a great project but it’s valued at $1.2b (so no 100x) and it uses CryptoNote, which is 2014 tech that relies on a decoy-based approach that could be vulnerable to more powerful computers in the future. Mimblewimble is just a better way to approach privacy because there is simply no data recorded in the blockchain for companies to surveil.
Privacy is not just for darknet markets, porn, money launderers and terrorists. In many countries it’s dangerous to be wealthy, and there are all kinds of problems with having your spending data be out there publicly and permanently for all to see. Namely, companies like Amazon are patenting approaches to identify people with their crypto addresses, “for law enforcement” but also so that, just like credit cards, your spending data can be used to target ads. (A) Coinbase is selling user data to the DEA, IRS, FBI, Secret Service, and who knows who else? (B) What about insurance companies raising your premiums or canceling your policy because they see you buying (legal) cannabis? If your business operates using transparent cryptocurrency, competitors can data mine your customer and supply chain data, and employees can see how much everyone else gets paid. I could go on, but the idea of “I have nothing to hide, so what do I care about privacy?” will increasingly ring hollow as people realize that this money printing will have to be paid by massive tax increases AND that those taxes will be directly debited from their “Central Bank Digital Currency” wallets.
100% privacy for all transactions also eliminates one HUGE problem that people aren’t aware of yet, but they will be: fungibility. Fungibility means that each coin is indistinguishable from any other, just like paper cash. Why is this important? Because of the ever-expanding reach of AML/KYC/KYT (Anti-Money Laundering / Know Your Customer / Know Your Transaction) as regulators cramp down on crypto and banks take over, increasingly coins become “tainted” in various ways. For example, if you withdraw coins to a mixing service like Wasabi or Samourai, you may find your account blocked. (C) The next obvious step is that if you receive coins that these chainalysis services don’t like for whatever reason, you will be completely innocent yet forced to prove that you didn’t know that the coins you bought were up to no good in a past life. 3 days ago, $100k of USDC was frozen. (D) Even smaller coins like LTC now have this problem, because “Chinese Drug Kingpins” used them. (E) I believe that censorable money that can be blocked/frozen isn’t really “your money”.
Epic Cash is a 100% volunteer community project (like XVG and XMR) that had a fair launch in September last year with no ICO and no premine. There are very few projects like this, and it’s a key ingredient in Verge’s success (still at $110m market cap today despite being down 97% since the bubble peak) and why it’s still around. It has a small but super passionate community of “Freemen” who are united by a belief in the sound money economics of Bitcoin Standard emission (21m supply limit and ever-decreasing inflation) and the importance of privacy.
I am super bullish on this coin for the following reasons:
Because it doesn’t have a huge marketing budget in a sea of VC-funded shitcoins, it is as-yet undiscovered, which is why it’s so cheap. There are only 4 Mimblewimble-based currencies on the market: MWC at $162m, BEAM at $26m, GRIN at $22m, and EPIC at $0.4m. This is not financial advice and as always, do your own research, but I’ve been buying this gem for months and will continue to.
This one ticks all the boxes for me, the only real problem is that it’s hard to buy much without causing a huge green candle. Alt season is coming, and coins like this are how your neighbor Chad got his Lambo back in 2017. For 2021, McLaren is a better choice and be sure to pay cash so that it doesn’t get repossessed like Chad!
  1. A https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/d35eax/amazon-bitcoin-patent-data-stream-identify-cryptocurrency-for-law-enforcement-government
  2. B https://decrypt.co/31461/coinbase-wants-to-identify-bitcoin-users-for-dea-irs
  3. C https://www.coindesk.com/binance-blockade-of-wasabi-wallet-could-point-to-a-crypto-crack-up
  4. D https://cointelegraph.com/news/centre-freezes-ethereum-address-holding-100k-usdc
  5. E https://www.coindesk.com/us-treasury-blacklists-bitcoin-litecoin-addresses-of-chinese-drug-kingpins
  6. F https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWkTxl5Z6DNN0ASMRxSKV5g
  7. G http://epic.tech/whitepaper
  8. H https://medium.com/epic-cash/epic-cash-on-uniswap-22447904d375
  9. I https://epic.tech/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/figure-3.1.jpg
Links:
submitted by pinchegringo to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

ETHE & GBTC (Grayscale) Frequently Asked Questions

It is no doubt Grayscale’s booming popularity as a mainstream investment has caused a lot of community hullabaloo lately. As such, I felt it was worth making a FAQ regarding the topic. I’m looking to update this as needed and of course am open to suggestions / adding any questions.
The goal is simply to have a thread we can link to anyone with questions on Grayscale and its products. Instead of explaining the same thing 3 times a day, shoot those posters over to this thread. My hope is that these questions are answered in a fairly simple and easy to understand manner. I think as the sub grows it will be a nice reference point for newcomers.
Disclaimer: I do NOT work for Grayscale and as such am basing all these answers on information that can be found on their website / reports. (Grayscale’s official FAQ can be found here). I also do NOT have a finance degree, I do NOT have a Series 6 / 7 / 140-whatever, and I do NOT work with investment products for my day job. I have an accounting background and work within the finance world so I have the general ‘business’ knowledge to put it all together, but this is all info determined in my best faith effort as a layman. The point being is this --- it is possible I may explain something wrong or missed the technical terms, and if that occurs I am more than happy to update anything that can be proven incorrect
Everything below will be in reference to ETHE but will apply to GBTC as well. If those two segregate in any way, I will note that accordingly.
What is Grayscale? 
Grayscale is the company that created the ETHE product. Their website is https://grayscale.co/
What is ETHE? 
ETHE is essentially a stock that intends to loosely track the price of ETH. It does so by having each ETHE be backed by a specific amount of ETH that is held on chain. Initially, the newly minted ETHE can only be purchased by institutions and accredited investors directly from Grayscale. Once a year has passed (6 months for GBTC) it can then be listed on the OTCQX Best Market exchange for secondary trading. Once listed on OTCQX, anyone investor can purchase at this point. Additional information on ETHE can be found here.
So ETHE is an ETF? 
No. For technical reasons beyond my personal understandings it is not labeled an ETF. I know it all flows back to the “Securities Act Rule 144”, but due to my limited knowledge on SEC regulations I don’t want to misspeak past that. If anyone is more knowledgeable on the subject I am happy to input their answer here.
How long has ETHE existed? 
ETHE was formed 12/14/2017. GBTC was formed 9/25/2013.
How is ETHE created? 
The trust will issue shares to “Authorized Participants” in groups of 100 shares (called baskets). Authorized Participants are the only persons that may place orders to create these baskets and they do it on behalf of the investor.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 39 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Note – The way their reports word this makes it sound like there is an army of authorizers doing the dirty work, but in reality there is only one Authorized Participant. At this moment the “Genesis” company is the sole Authorized Participant. Genesis is owned by the “Digital Currency Group, Inc.” which is the parent company of Grayscale as well. (And to really go down the rabbit hole it looks like DCG is the parent company of CoinDesk and is “backing 150+ companies across 30 countries, including Coinbase, Ripple, and Chainalysis.”)
Source: Digital Currency Group, Inc. informational section on page 77 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
Source: Barry E. Silbert informational section on page 75 of the “Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (BTC) Form 10-K (2019)” – Located Here
How does Grayscale acquire the ETH to collateralize the ETHE product? 
An Investor may acquire ETHE by paying in cash or exchanging ETH already owned.
Source: Creation and Redemption of Shares section on page 40 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Where does Grayscale store their ETH? Does it have a specific wallet address we can follow? 
ETH is stored with Coinbase Custody Trust Company, LLC. I am unaware of any specific address or set of addresses that can be used to verify the ETH is actually there.
As an aside - I would actually love to see if anyone knows more about this as it’s something that’s sort of peaked my interest after being asked about it… I find it doubtful we can find that however.
Source: Part C. Business Information, Item 8, subsection A. on page 16 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Can ETHE be redeemed for ETH? 
No, currently there is no way to give your shares of ETHE back to Grayscale to receive ETH back. The only method of getting back into ETH would be to sell your ETHE to someone else and then use those proceeds to buy ETH yourself.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Why are they not redeeming shares? 
I think the report summarizes it best:
Redemptions of Shares are currently not permitted and the Trust is unable to redeem Shares. Subject to receipt of regulatory approval from the SEC and approval by the Sponsor in its sole discretion, the Trust may in the future operate a redemption program. Because the Trust does not believe that the SEC would, at this time, entertain an application for the waiver of rules needed in order to operate an ongoing redemption program, the Trust currently has no intention of seeking regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program.
Source: Redemption Procedures on page 41 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the fee structure? 
ETHE has an annual fee of 2.5%. GBTC has an annual fee of 2.0%. Fees are paid by selling the underlying ETH / BTC collateralizing the asset.
Source: ETHE’s informational page on Grayscale’s website - Located Here
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 & 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
What is the ratio of ETH to ETHE? 
At the time of posting (6/19/2020) each ETHE share is backed by .09391605 ETH. Each share of GBTC is backed by .00096038 BTC.
ETHE & GBTC’s specific information page on Grayscale’s website updates the ratio daily – Located Here
For a full historical look at this ratio, it can be found on the Grayscale home page on the upper right side if you go to Tax Documents > 2019 Tax Documents > Grayscale Ethereum Trust 2019 Tax Letter.
Why is the ratio not 1:1? Why is it always decreasing? 
While I cannot say for certain why the initial distribution was not a 1:1 backing, it is more than likely to keep the price down and allow more investors a chance to purchase ETHE / GBTC.
As noted above, fees are paid by selling off the ETH collateralizing ETHE. So this number will always be trending downward as time goes on.
Source: Description of Trust on page 32 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
I keep hearing about how this is locked supply… explain? 
As noted above, there is currently no redemption program for converting your ETHE back into ETH. This means that once an ETHE is issued, it will remain in circulation until a redemption program is formed --- something that doesn’t seem to be too urgent for the SEC or Grayscale at the moment. Tiny amounts will naturally be removed due to fees, but the bulk of the asset is in there for good.
Knowing that ETHE cannot be taken back and destroyed at this time, the ETH collateralizing it will not be removed from the wallet for the foreseeable future. While it is not fully locked in the sense of say a totally lost key, it is not coming out any time soon.
Per their annual statement:
The Trust’s ETH will be transferred out of the ETH Account only in the following circumstances: (i) transferred to pay the Sponsor’s Fee or any Additional Trust Expenses, (ii) distributed in connection with the redemption of Baskets (subject to the Trust’s obtaining regulatory approval from the SEC to operate an ongoing redemption program and the consent of the Sponsor), (iii) sold on an as-needed basis to pay Additional Trust Expenses or (iv) sold on behalf of the Trust in the event the Trust terminates and liquidates its assets or as otherwise required by law or regulation.
Source: Description of Trust on page 31 of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
Grayscale now owns a huge chunk of both ETH and BTC’s supply… should we be worried about manipulation, a sell off to crash the market crash, a staking cartel? 
First, it’s important to remember Grayscale is a lot more akin to an exchange then say an investment firm. Grayscale is working on behalf of its investors to create this product for investor control. Grayscale doesn’t ‘control’ the ETH it holds any more then Coinbase ‘controls’ the ETH in its hot wallet. (Note: There are likely some varying levels of control, but specific to this topic Grayscale cannot simply sell [legally, at least] the ETH by their own decision in the same manner Coinbase wouldn't be able to either.)
That said, there shouldn’t be any worry in the short to medium time-frame. As noted above, Grayscale can’t really remove ETH other than for fees or termination of the product. At 2.5% a year, fees are noise in terms of volume. Grayscale seems to be the fastest growing product in the crypto space at the moment and termination of the product seems unlikely.
IF redemptions were to happen tomorrow, it’s extremely unlikely we would see a mass exodus out of the product to redeem for ETH. And even if there was incentive to get back to ETH, the premium makes it so that it would be much more cost effective to just sell your ETHE on the secondary market and buy ETH yourself. Remember, any redemption is up to the investors and NOT something Grayscale has direct control over.
Yes, but what about [insert criminal act here]… 
Alright, yes. Technically nothing is stopping Grayscale from selling all the ETH / BTC and running off to the Bahamas (Hawaii?). BUT there is no real reason for them to do so. Barry is an extremely public figure and it won’t be easy for him to get away with that. Grayscale’s Bitcoin Trust creates SEC reports weekly / bi-weekly and I’m sure given the sentiment towards crypto is being watched carefully. Plus, Grayscale is making tons of consistent revenue and thus has little to no incentive to give that up for a quick buck.
That’s a lot of ‘happy little feels’ Bob, is there even an independent audit or is this Tether 2.0? 
Actually yes, an independent auditor report can be found in their annual reports. It is clearly aimed more towards the financial side and I doubt the auditors are crypto savants, but it is at least one extra set of eyes. Auditors are Friedman LLP – Auditor since 2015.
Source: Independent Auditor Report starting on page 116 (of the PDF itself) of the “Grayscale Ethereum Trust Annual Report (2019)” – Located Here
As mentioned by user TheCrpytosAndBloods (In Comments Below), a fun fact:
The company’s auditors Friedman LLP were also coincidentally TetheBitfinex’s auditors until They controversially parted ways in 2018 when the Tether controversy was at its height. I am not suggesting for one moment that there is anything shady about DCG - I just find it interesting it’s the same auditor.
“Grayscale sounds kind of lame” / “Not your keys not your crypto!” / “Why is anyone buying this, it sounds like a scam?” 
Welp, for starters this honestly is not really a product aimed at the people likely to be reading this post. To each their own, but do remember just because something provides no value to you doesn’t mean it can’t provide value to someone else. That said some of the advertised benefits are as follows:
So for example, I can set up an IRA at a brokerage account that has $0 trading fees. Then I can trade GBTC and ETHE all day without having to worry about tracking my taxes. All with the relative safety something like E-Trade provides over Binance.
As for how it benefits the everyday ETH holder? I think the supply lock is a positive. I also think this product exposes the Ethereum ecosystem to people who otherwise wouldn’t know about it.
Why is there a premium? Why is ETHE’s premium so insanely high compared to GBTC’s premium? 
There are a handful of theories of why a premium exists at all, some even mentioned in the annual report. The short list is as follows:
Why is ETHE’s so much higher the GBTC’s? Again, a few thoughts:

Are there any other differences between ETHE and GBTC? 
I touched on a few of the smaller differences, but one of the more interesting changes is GBTC is now a “SEC reporting company” as of January 2020. Which again goes beyond my scope of knowledge so I won’t comment on it too much… but the net result is GBTC is now putting out weekly / bi-weekly 8-K’s and annual 10-K’s. This means you can track GBTC that much easier at the moment as well as there is an extra layer of validity to the product IMO.
I’m looking for some statistics on ETHE… such as who is buying, how much is bought, etc? 
There is a great Q1 2020 report I recommend you give a read that has a lot of cool graphs and data on the product. It’s a little GBTC centric, but there is some ETHE data as well. It can be found here hidden within the 8-K filings.Q1 2020 is the 4/16/2020 8-K filing.
For those more into a GAAP style report see the 2019 annual 10-K of the same location.
Is Grayscale only just for BTC and ETH? 
No, there are other products as well. In terms of a secondary market product, ETCG is the Ethereum Classic version of ETHE. Fun Fact – ETCG was actually put out to the secondary market first. It also has a 3% fee tied to it where 1% of it goes to some type of ETC development fund.
In terms of institutional and accredited investors, there are a few ‘fan favorites’ such as Bitcoin Cash, Litcoin, Stellar, XRP, and Zcash. Something called Horizion (Backed by ZEN I guess? Idk to be honest what that is…). And a diversified Mutual Fund type fund that has a little bit of all of those. None of these products are available on the secondary market.
Are there alternatives to Grayscale? 
I know they exist, but I don’t follow them. I’ll leave this as a “to be edited” section and will add as others comment on what they know.
Per user Over-analyser (in comments below):
Coinshares (Formerly XBT provider) are the only similar product I know of. BTC, ETH, XRP and LTC as Exchange Traded Notes (ETN).
It looks like they are fully backed with the underlying crypto (no premium).
https://coinshares.com/etps/xbt-provideinvestor-resources/daily-hedging-position
Denominated in SEK and EUR. Certainly available in some UK pensions (SIPP).
As asked by pegcity - Okay so I was under the impression you can just give them your own ETH and get ETHE, but do you get 11 ETHE per ETH or do you get the market value of ETH in USD worth of ETHE? 
I have always understood that the ETHE issued directly through Grayscale is issued without the premium. As in, if I were to trade 1 ETH for ETHE I would get 11, not say only 2 or 3 because the secondary market premium is so high. And if I were paying cash only I would be paying the price to buy 1 ETH to get my 11 ETHE. Per page 39 of their annual statement, it reads as follows:
The Trust will issue Shares to Authorized Participants from time to time, but only in one or more Baskets (with a Basket being a block of 100 Shares). The Trust will not issue fractions of a Basket. The creation (and, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redemption) of Baskets will be made only in exchange for the delivery to the Trust, or the distribution by the Trust, of the number of whole and fractional ETH represented by each Basket being created (or, should the Trust commence a redemption program, redeemed), which is determined by dividing (x) the number of ETH owned by the Trust at 4:00 p.m., New York time, on the trade date of a creation or redemption order, after deducting the number of ETH representing the U.S. dollar value of accrued but unpaid fees and expenses of the Trust (converted using the ETH Index Price at such time, and carried to the eighth decimal place), by (y) the number of Shares outstanding at such time (with the quotient so obtained calculated to one one-hundred-millionth of one ETH (i.e., carried to the eighth decimal place)), and multiplying such quotient by 100 (the “Basket ETH Amount”). All questions as to the calculation of the Basket ETH Amount will be conclusively determined by the Sponsor and will be final and binding on all persons interested in the Trust. The Basket ETH Amount multiplied by the number of Baskets being created or redeemed is the “Total Basket ETH Amount.” The number of ETH represented by a Share will gradually decrease over time as the Trust’s ETH are used to pay the Trust’s expenses. Each Share represented approximately 0.0950 ETH and 0.0974 ETH as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

submitted by Bob-Rossi to ethfinance [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency and Taxes

Hello Guys, how is your day? It is nice to meet you. My name is Martin.
This article is going to be a bit long. Prepare yourself. I would like to use the internet as a way how to be opened minded. I do believe, that I will find a few people who have a similar point of view about life.
Let´s start. These books are the books which I have listened/read so far
Robert Kiyosaki: Rich Dad Poor Dad
Napoleon Hill: Think and Grow Rich
Robert Cialdini: Psychology of Persuasion
Dale Carnegie: How to Win Friends and Influence People
Eric Reiss: Lean Startup
Jason Fried and David Hansson: Rework
Henry Hazlitt: Economics in One Lesson
Mike Weinberg: New Sales Simplified
Mike Weinberg: Sales Management Simplified
Joe Girardi (I am using his previous surname because he had to change it due to business): How to Sell Anything to Anybody
Chriss Voss with Tahl Raz: Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It
Kevin Horsley: Unlimited Memory
Daniel Kahneman: Thinking Fast and Slow
Now I do hope, that you realized, that I am trying to improve if anyone has any book, which has value in the crypto sphere bring it here (or economy). I want to say, that I took my risk and I am comfortable with it.
I know that the tax year is next year, however it is better to be prepared now.
Let´s say that I am 23 years old. I don´t have commitments (expect bills and work) currently living in UK I realized, that I have two important dreams.
  1. Be independent ( Don´t get me wrong I like to work and gain the money for initial investment, however, I would rather be doing long term investing/ day trading and be around my kid (in the future), than working long hours as a waiter plus I realized, that people talking to me differently when they have a higher position. I do agree, that humanity was raised in a hierarchy, therefore I want to get out of it as soon as possible.
  2. Take care of my family and friends plus give the spare money back to the community (music festival, homeless people, donations, etc.
I made move-in crypto. I did some day trading 2-3 per day because I wanted to know if I can do it. Otherwise, I am thinking about it as long term ( I will go back to work when we open a restaurant). I did a few successful trades. Few not so much, but I waited and they become successful as well. I got lucky or fundamentals got lucky. I don´t know. I also realized, that for date trading I need more money.

My road map is.
a) Try to get as much as I can from this bull market
b) Leave the job and become day trader
I want to do everything legally, therefore here is the problem
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tax-on-cryptoassets/cryptoassets-for-individuals
https://koinly.io/ I have heard from other people who are using this software (on youtube) what are your thoughts?
1.) What if I am holding a Security token, which I have to convert to exchange token, therefore I will be paying capital gain tax or income tax? So far I know, that people converting to fiat money only Bitcoin.
I might miss something.
2.) How do I pay tax, If I don´t want to change my tokens to Cryptocurrency?
3.) Is it better to trade as an individual or create a business?
I know that this topic is complicated for many people therefore if my questions are hard to answer. Give me a shout and I will try to explain it.
Is there anyone who could help me out or give me a link on a good accountant? ( I am going to ask at work our accountant about this topis)
For me, this is serious problem. Obviously I want to pay as fewer taxes as I can because I will use this money for buying a house etc. therefore I will put the money back to the economy. On the other hand, I agree with paying taxes.
So far I am doing well guys I have a 75 percent return on investment in 2 months. It can go to 0 even minus, but I do believe it can go even higher.
Thank you for reading it so far! If you want I can get here more links of tax software providers. (I am curious how they are thinking about exchange, security and utility token).
I hope, that I can post it here because it is a cryptocurrency group.
I do like cryptocurrency. It consists of sociology, economy, international relationship etc.
Thanks to everyone who read it so far.
PS. I don´t want to promote anything. This is my life. I am real.
Kind Regards
Martin
submitted by MartinB666 to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

I'm kinda ok with MCO -> CRO Swap; a indepth personal view

EDIT: this post https://www.reddit.com/Crypto_com/comments/i2yhuz/open_letter_to_kris_from_one_of_cdcs_biggest/ from u/CryptoMines expresses my sentiments and concerns better than I could ever put into words myself. I'd say read his/her post instead.
Very long post ahead, but TL;DR, I actually see this swap as a positive change, despite fearing for what it may do to my portofolio, and having mixed feelings about its consequences on CDC reputation.Before I start, for the sake of context and bias, here's my personal situation as a CDC user:
  1. I'm just a average Joe, with a 500 MCO Jade card. I bough 50 MCO at 5,22€ in September 2019 and staked for Ruby, then bough 440 MCO at 2.47€ in March 2020 and upgraded to Jade. The total amount of MCO I own is currently 515, and everything above the 500 stake is cashback rewards.
  2. I bought MCO exclusively for the card and bonus Earn interest benefits, and had no plans to unstake my MCO. Now with the swap, definetly won't unstake.
  3. The MCO -> CRO conversion rates increased the fiat value of my MCO in about 1000€.
  4. I own a decent amount of CRO, wich I bought at ~0,031€ in March 2020.
  5. The country where I live is crypto friendly and completely crypto-tax free; I only have to pay income tax if I deposit a certain threshold of fiat in my bank.
Take all these factors into account as possible (if not major) influencers or bias on my opinions; both the emotional and economical ones. Call me a fool or a devil's advocate if you want, but keep your torches and pitchforks down. As we say here on Reddit: "Remember the human".-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Like all of you, I woke up to find this anouncement, wich came right the #[email protected] out of nowere, and gives you little to no options. Good or bad, this announcement arrived as basicly a "comply or die" choice. Emotionally, this came as both terrifying and disgusting; but rationally, I cannot blame CDC for it.
Because wether we like it or not, CDC is a centralized company, and the MCO tokens were never a stock or legally binding contract; something wich pretty much every crypto company or ICO warns in their T&C and risk warnings. Not to mention the mostly unregulated status of the cryptocurrency and. I'll call this "dishonest" any day, but I cannot see it as a "scammy" since I can't see how they broke any rules or terms.
A scammer would take your money/assets away, but CDC is offering you to swap it for another asset wich you can sell right away if you want. And at current price, it is still worth more or less as much fiat as MCO cost at the 5 $/€ wich was more or less the comunity standard used for calculating the card prices. And by that, I mean that the fiat value of 50/500/5000 MCO (as CRO) is actually not far from the 250/2500/25'000 $/€ that the comunity commonly used as standard when calculating the ROI and (under)valuation of MCO.
So CDC is at least trying to give us the option to get (some) our money back, and not at a unfair rate. If you happened to buy MCO at a price higher than this, I can't see how that's CDC's fault, just as I don't see anyone blaming Bitcoin or Altcoins for getting them stuck at the top of the 2017 bubble burst.
I read many posts in this reddit calling this a "backstab" and "betrayal" of early investors and for the people who "believed in MCO". Emotionally, I share your sentiment.But after thinking it for a while, I'd say this was actually very rewarding for early investors and long term MCO supporters. As CDC clearly sates in the swap rules; nobody is going to lose their card tier or MCO stake benefits (at least not yet), and your stake DOES NOT unstake automatically after 180 days. Actually, so far they never did unstake automatically, you had to manually unstake yourself.
With this in mind, everyone who already got their cards, or at least staked MCO to reserve one, basicly got them 3-5 times cheaper than future users; and IMHO, now the $/€ price of cards feels more fair and sustainable compared to their benefits.So in a sense, everyone who supported and believed on the MCO for its utility (i.e. the card and app benefits) has been greatly rewarded with perks that they get to keep, but are now out of reach for a lot of people.Likewise, the people who believed and invested in CRO (for whatever reason), have also been rewarded, as their CRO tokens now have more utility.
So either the price of CRO crashes down to around 0.05 $/€, or the people who bought MCO/CRO early or cheap are now massively benefited. But then again, so is everyone who bought or mined Bitcoin in its early days, or invested in Bitcoin at crucial points of its history... how is that unfair? Some people bought Ethereum at 1'400 $ on a mix of hopes/promises that it would continue to rise; it didn't. And even today with DeFi and ETH 2.0 ever closer, it is still far from that price.
And I know what some of you are thinking: "The cards aren't avaiable in my country yet, that's why I didn't buy/stake."Well, they weren't avaiable in my country either when I staked 50 MCO. Heck, the cards weren't avaiable in anyones country when MCO started, but many people still bought it and staked it. That's exacly what "early adopter", "long supporter" and "believing in MCO" means.
On the other hand, the people who invested on MCO as a speculative asset and decided to HODL and hoard MCO, hoping for its price to moon and then sell MCO at big profit, had their dreams mercilessly crushed by this swap... and good lord, I feel their pain.But this is also where I'll commit the sin of being judgemental, because IMHO, speculating on MCO never made any sense to me; MCO was a utility token, not a value token, so it should not (and could not) ever be worth more than the value of its utility. That's basicly how stablecoins and PAXG are able to stay stable; because nobody will pay more/less than the value of the asset/service they represent.
Tough now that I'm looking at the new card stake tiers in CRO, I have to give credit to the MCO hodlers I just now criticised; maybe you were right all along. Unless the price of CRO crashes or corrects, I wich case, I un-rest my case.
One thing I'll agree with everyone tough, is that I fell that CDC just suckerpunched it's comunity. Because even if we have no vote on its decisions (wich again, we aren't necessarily entitled to, since they are a privante and centralized business) they should/could have warned that this was in their plans well in advance; if anything to allow those who wouldn't like it to exit this train calmly.
Also the CRO stake duration reset. The mandatory reset of your CRO stake for taking advantage of the early swap bonus feels like another gut-punch.
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Now that we got emotional feelings out of the way, here's my sentiment about how this will affect the overall CDC ecossystem.
One common criticism of the sustainability of MCO was that its supply cap could never allow a large number of cards to be issued, and how could CDC keep paying the cashbacks and rebates. On the oposite corner, one of the major criticisms of the sustainability of CRO, was it's ridiculously huge supply cap and inflation caused by the gradual un-freezing and release of more CRO into the system.
But now that MCO and CRO became one, it might just have made both issues more sustainable. Now the huge supply cap of CRO makes more sense, as it allows a much larger number of future users to stake for cards (at higher costs, but still). And because most card cashback is small parcels, this large supply also ensures that CDC can keep paying said cashbacks for a long time; especially since it can be semi-renewable trough the trading fees we pay in CRO.
Before this, the MCO you got as cashback had no use, other than selling it for fiat or speculate on its price. But CRO can be used, at the very least, to receive a discount on trading fees. And everytime you pay trading fees in CRO or spend CRO on a Syndicate event, some of that CRO goes back to CDC, wich they can use to keep paying the cahsback/rebates.
And keep in mind, the technicalities of CRO can be changed, as well as the perks and utilities it can be used for. So even if this current model doesn't fix everything (wich it probably doesn't) it can still be changed to patch problems or expand its use.
Another obvious potentially positive outcome of this, is that now CDC only has to focus on 1 token, so it makes it easier to manage and drive its value. People complained that CDC was neglecting MCO over promoting CRO, but now they can focus on both services (cards/exchange) at the same time. Sure, this might not bring much advantage to the common customer, but its probably a major resource saver and optimizer at corporate levels; wich in the long term ultimately benefits its customers.
Much like Ethereum is undergoing major changes to ensure its scalability, the crypto companies themselves also have to change to acommodate the growing number of users, especially as the cryptomarket and DeFi are growing and becoming more competitive. Business strategies that were once successfull became obsolete, and exchanges that once held near-monopolies had to adjust to rising competitors. There is no reason why CDC shouldn't keep up with this, or at least try to.
Point is, the financial markets, crypto or otherwise, are not a status quo haven. And when something is wrong, something has to be changed, even if it costs. The very rise of cryptocurrencies and blockchain, wich is why we are here in the first place, is a perfect example of this, as it experiments and provides alternatives to legacy/traditional products and technologies.
Was this the best solution to its current problems? Is this what will protect us as customers from a potentially unsustainable business model? I have no idea.
This change ripped me too from my previous more or less relaxed status quo (the safety of the value of the CRO I bough for cheap), along with CRO late investors wich now probably fear for the devaluation of their CRO. To say nothing of the blow this represents for my trust (and I believe everyone elses trust) on CDC and its public relations. It's not what CDC did, it's how they did it.
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Wether you actually bothered to read all I wrote or just skip everything (can't blame you), I'm eager to hear your opinions and whatever criticisms on my opinions you may have.
If you just want to vent at me, you are welcome too; now you can raise your pitchforks and torches.
submitted by BoilingGarbage to Crypto_com [link] [comments]

Coinbase.com cheats their customers in plain sight. Why do we put up with this?

Last night I needed a small amount of crypto and decided to purchase some on coinbase.com (normally I use coinbase pro for trading, but this was a unique situation).
I was already dreading it because I knew I would be paying a premium to buy with my debit card, but hey, that's that convenience tax for you. What I wasn't expecting was to also get ripped off on an imaginary spread. I have purchased with my debit card on Coinbase in the past, and never paid much attention to the "price per coin" as I thought this was the grand total (after including the high premium for paying with a debit card). However, last night, I decided to actually do the math.
The purchase was for $140 total at 2:57 PM EST March 23. The transaction fee was $5.37 so that means I purchased $134.63 worth of Bitcoin.
The price for BTC at that time was $11674.90 so that means I should have received
0.01153157628 BTC
However what I received was:
.01148441 BTC
or a difference of about
0.00004716628 or ($.059 USD)
If you do the math, and factor in that difference, it will line up the price per coin they show in the image at $11722.85.
This can not be summed up to market movement and paying the spread, as the price for BTC had not been anywhere near $11722.85 for a couple of hours before my purchase.
The amounts here are small and pretty irrelevant. The important point here is to illustrate that Coinbase is charging customers a "ghost" spread when they buy on coinbase.com.
submitted by el_diablo_robotico to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Cashing out come crypto, how to pay taxes on it

I bought some bitcoin in 2017 on GDAX. Sent it to a couple other exchanges to sell for alt currencies. Two of those exchanges are completely gone and another I don't have access to. I ended up sending it all to Binance where I did a lot of day trading in 2017/2018 but I never cashed out. After it all dropped, I put all the crypto I had into a wallet and haven't touched them since. They're rebounding now and I'm thinking of cashing it out for a house down payment. I'm worried it's going to be a problem declaring it because I never declared or paid taxes on those trades in 2017/2018, I was stupid and thought I only had to pay taxes on exchanges to fiat. I also answered no to the crypto question on my 2019 return because I was holding crypto, I never actually did anything with it (question didn't ask if you had any crypto holdings). I've never received any letters related to crypto from the IRS or any exchange.
I have records of my original transfers from fiat to bitcoin, so I know exactly what the cost basis is for all my cryptos. The problem is, from that original purchase to the crypto I have now, there's hundreds of transactions, most of which no longer have any existing records. Can I just list those original bitcoin purchases from fiat in 2017 and then my sales this year when I declare long term gains or are they going to do more digging and require me to show how the bitcoin I bought turned into several alt coins?
submitted by TheDessertGrinch to tax [link] [comments]

GOLD vs. ฿ITCOIN

Question:
I have a legitimate question for both the Bitcoin Bro's and the Old Gold Stan's... and here it is... If your shit actually is worth what you say it is...
Why do you still have to convert/sell or exchange it into "fiat" currency before buying things.
Imagine walking into a store to but a bike with bitcoin, but during your time in the store, BTC drops a bunch, then rises again after you pay for the bike.
Congrats, your $200 bike just cost you $275. Also, (assuming were living in some sort of free market/capitalist society where Bikes are sold, Crypto is accepted across a vast swath of the economy, and the store is equipped to accept the transaction...) Are you going to pay taxes on that purchase? Yes? Is it on the $200 or the $275? Congrats! You just lost another $19 worth of your fancy techno imaginary play money. Now Fuck off.
And to all the 77 year old, gold cult members out there who have been saying gold was gonna rise for the past 30 years. Congrats, you were finally right for once. It was also bound to happen, and its part of a cycle, its a trend, and it will reverse. Then you can go back to hunting bigfoot and living in your schoolbus bunker buried halfway into a hillside. Imagine having to pay for a cheeseburger in flakes of gold, or having to wait for some dude to melt your gold bar over a furnace to use half of it to buy a car.
BTW, with Gold and Bitcoin as a currency - that also eliminates the possibility of credit and credit cards. Say goodbye to cell phones, information, internet, television and technology in general. You would literally be sending us backwards hundreds of years and we would have to send text messages via carrier pigeons. Not all credit is bad, nor is it all good. Thats why we have credit scores. And not all credit turns into irreparable debt, You fucks.
This is why the fucking dollar exists. Its not perfect, but its about as close as it gets to perfect currency. Yes it has less value sometimes... but it has held the fuck up so far and created the most advanced, durable, and beneficial economy in the history of the human race. The existence of our dollar has helped hundreds of countries establish democracy and freedom in their governments and lifted billions of people out of poverty (for most of the world) Its not the value of the dollar that makes it standard, its the idea. America is the global superpower, and with that comes the global currency. Every country relies on it. Pretty much - Our dollar is good anywhere, anytime, in any country whether its 80% of what it was in 1980, or 120%
I dont give a fuck how much inflation you think is gonna happen, I dont give a fuck about how much our National debt is, The dollar is here to stay.
Gold's value relies on the dollar, not the other way around. And Crypto is literally fucking non-existent...and without technology, electricity and the internet (paid for with dollars) you all would be trading crypto by using a pencil and paper, and the complicated blockchain bullshit would be reduced down to elementary mathematics.
To all the Gold and Bitcoin fucks, keep on dreaming, and stay in your lane.
submitted by white_rodman to pennystocks [link] [comments]

First time investment/financial planning 28F single income

Hi all! I'm new to investing and planning for retirement etc, and also kind of new to reddit so apologies if I don't follow etiquette or rules properly.
I've finally saved beyond my emergency fund goal and am ready to start putting money into retirement/investing etc, but I've got a lot to learn. I don't have anyone in my personal life who can give me advice or teach me about investing. Firstly I'm looking for recommendations on easy reads and cheap/free ways of learning about finance and investment for someone who doesn't know any of the lingo. I don't know the difference between a bank and a credit union for example, or what capital gains or assets mean. I've only been in Canada 5 years (I'm from the UK, no plans to return yet but if I do it probably won't be for another 5 years). Secondly, I'm looking for hints and tips for my current financial plan (below) before I actually start moving money around.
I'm earning ~$50k and save an average of $800/month. I have ~$40k in student debt from the UK but at only 1.5% interest rate, and I'm currently repaying just above the interest rate which is more than the minimum payment. The debt supposedly wipes out after 25 years, but I don't trust the UK government not to sell off the loans and the idea of my debt increasing rather than decreasing makes me uncomfortable. With what I'm repaying I should finish paying it off in about 25 years anyway.
I have $15k in savings currently in EQ earning 2% interest (1.43% after tax I think). I want to keep $10k in emergency funds in my EQ savings, and invest the remaining. I have never opened an RRSP or TFSA. I joined my company retirement savings plan in April which is 6% of my income with 9% match funding (about $3200/year from me and $8k from my company).
I was thinking of putting my spare $5k into WealthSimple as follows:
-RRSP: $1k starting balance, risk level 6 balanced, then $250/month added in. Probably won't touch it ever unless I decide to buy a house, so I'm hoping that the higher risk level will be worth it after 5-10 years.
-TFSA: $1k starting balance, risk level 4 balanced, then $450/month. This I want to play a bit safer but still earn a decent return. I may want to dip into it in the next 3 years if i decide to buy a car or in 5 years+ for a downpayment for a house.
-Crypto: when it opens, I want to put $1k into bitcoin and just leave it for 10-20 years and just see what happens. I tried getting into Quadrixa and another crypto trading site a year ago but had issues verifying my identity and ended up giving up.
So that leaves me another $2k to play with for now. Should I hold onto it and keep it in EQ until I have a better idea for how to use it, or put it in my TFSA, or is there something else that's safe but will offer more than 1.43% interest after tax that I can put it into? I was going to put it in a low risk (level 3) personal account on WealthSimple but I think the yield on that was only 0.43% which was way less than EQ so I don't see the point? Alterna bank offers a 1.63% TFSA account so seeing as I won't meet my allowance anytime soon it could be worth putting some money in there, though I'm not sure it's worth the effort opening yet another bank account.
I'm not really earning enough that I want to max out my RRSP for the tax income break yet. I'd rather have more 'useable' (cash?) savings, but perhaps someone can convince me otherwise.
Any help/advice/personal experience would be appreciated! As well as reassurance not to panic if I lose money in the first X years. Thank you!
Edit: Sounds like everyone is saying I should keep my RRSP allowance for when I'm earning more, and keep my emergency funds in the HISA and everything else into a TFSA. Not heard anyone say not to use the WealthSimple TFSA so I guess that's where it's going! Thanks everyone!
submitted by starlight_conquest to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Prepping for a Financial crisis / hyperinflation.

So what can we do about it? Any ideas are welcome.
It has a lot of "what if's"... It depends how tax and law play out with it.Historically speaking:
  1. -I stock bulk diesel for my cars while following historical averages to buy cheap.
  2. -Rotating food stock
  3. -Extra maintenance items, including the big things like a roof on your home if its coming time. Not joking I have a spare water heater and backup heating options, along with minor parts and filters to fix them. Same with cars and engines, (spark plugs, filters (all different filters), oil, cheap sensors that usually go bad and are only 4-10$ each, 1-2 extra alternator per vehicle, belts, mowing belts, bearings, grease, ... and I've literally had to use everything on that list and reorder.)
  1. -Security, Locks, Alarms, Cameras, people steal.
  2. A deep freezer for instance can stock food you use and buy on sale.
  3. Solar energy and solar heating supplements energy you use anyways
  4. Rainwater can be collected and used rather than buying from a source.
  5. A cooking gadget vs eating out.
  6. Tools and learning to fix things vs hire.
  7. House insulation.-Better insulative windows, and sealing.
  8. Geo-Thermal
  9. Gardening
  10. Bidet on toilet (lol serious though...)
  11. Backup power
  12. Your education can be a huge one, not just for prepping but also in your work.
  13. Things that prevent rot, fire, flood / humidity, or failure. Humidity is a silent killer to many preps. (water sump pumps, dehumidifiers, leak prevention, fire extinguishers / sprinklers, )
submitted by AntiSonOfBitchamajig to preppers [link] [comments]

Digital Dollar, FedNow, CBDC, the central banks spending and global push for more control through digital currency.

At the beginning of the Covid-19 outbreak a few interesting things happened. China introduced the "Digital Yuan / RMB" And in April the "Digital dollar" was proposed in the first stimulus bill here in the USA. And they haven't stopped talking about it since. High tables from the White house Financial committee, Federal Reserve, US congress. Aiming to have a digital currency working as early as 2021 to provide UBI / Universal basic income to the masses, all while being able to track, freeze, limit, manipulate spending throughout the economy. Starting to sound rather like a "Black mirror film" isn't it? Well...China has taken it a step farther with their "Social Credit system" watching and controlling nearly every aspect of life. . . but we're here to talk about currency. How could this even happen in America? Well, to start
All of the above is a partial list of factors devaluing the Dollar and trust in it from several ways and views. At the end of the day it has a huge amount of enemies, that are all looking for ways to get out of it.
Some of what I'm seeing personally.
It is a death spiral for the working person, where it used to be "No more than 30% of your wage going to housing" It is now well over 50%....Just look at this recent post in Frugal https://www.reddit.com/Frugal/comments/ifqah1/is_it_normal_for_a_third_to_a_half_of_you?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3
This death spiral I foresee getting worse. And historically any "tax" / regulation cost will just be passed down to the consumer in form of increased prices until people / businesses move elsewhere as we've seen in several cities around the US.

So what can we do? Buy Gold! Silver! Bitcoin! Stocks! I hear people roar, They aren't exactly wrong as history shows... but have you considered the 30-40% tax on the "gain"? Even when that asset buys the same value before tax? What if the government makes it illegal like the 1933 order: 6102 Where you couldn't own gold for nearly 50 years? You're frozen out, or even out on taxes (which will likely be more strict and controlled later in time).
I'd say Invest in things that will
Metals are the next step when a person has plenty of the above. You get to a point where you have hundreds of thousands, if not millions that you need to condense into something real.
It is all about the savings or productivity gain of the investment. For instance I would wager that many preppers have gotten more use / value out of a $800 clothes washer than a $800 rifle. (have you ever had to do manual laundry???) Sure the rifle will hold value...but it often doesn't pay you back with time / what it saved and / or what it has produced during its life unless you are using it. Same can be said of security cameras, a generator, a tractor, trailer, garden, tools, ect.
Look at history even, in countries that have experienced hyperinflation people that already had tangibles they regularly use were way ahead. It could even be honey, a tool, extra maintenance parts, can of food, that bottle of medicine, a computer to keep your intel on point, (cough # PrepperIntel plug) use of your equipment to do or make something for someone. Real Estate is good too, it rides inflation well and has many ways of being productive.
Your metals could be sitting there like the rifle, and could be subject to hot debate and laws. Meanwhile that garden is paying back, chainsaw is helping saw up wood, or your tractor is helping a job, your tools just helped you fix something / saved you much loss, Your security stopped a loss not by a person, but an random animal stealing things. Or that $25,000 solar array is paying you back by the day in spades...while making you independent...running all your tools you're using to make things to sell, and even heating / cooling some of the house with the extra juice while places around you experience rolling blackouts. You were even smart and took the current 24% tax benefit the government has saving you $5000 on it for batteries. Don't get me started if you have an electric vehicle with solar... I'm rambling at this point...and all those stealthy / direct and passive background savings...even if the crap doesn't hit the fan.
So anyways, With out of control central banks and big governments, digital currencies, How do you think it will play out? Are we heading to dystopia?
submitted by AntiSonOfBitchamajig to PrepperIntel [link] [comments]

MCS | 100% Profitable Bitcoin Trading Method

MCS | 100% Profitable Bitcoin Trading Method
\This post has been written by Hedgehog, an MCS influencer and one of Korea's famous cryptocurrency key opinion leaders.*

https://preview.redd.it/bbpp5xnhqph51.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=a20d1f5bafd59fa278e1ed677a510f505efd77df
#Be_a_Trader!
Greetings from MCS, the derivatives trading platform where traders ALWAYS come first.

Cryptocurrency traders are realizing valuable profits through intense trading in their own way. The strategy I am going to share with you is not complicated and may not be the best strategy, but it is a way to trade Bitcoin that is 100% profitable.

🎯 What are Funding Fees?


https://preview.redd.it/4u0f9vniqph51.png?width=1302&format=png&auto=webp&s=a6d77da5f4930a7699b730d57096a7248dd2a907
If you want to trade in bitcoin with 100% profitability, you must first understand the concept of funding fees of perpetual contracts. Due to the nature of Bitcoin perpetual contracts, as it it is a futures product with no expiration date, the gap between the spot price and contract price is closely maintained through funding fees. In simple terms, the funding fee is paid or received once every 8 hours each day to prevent the price of the MCS BTC/USDT perpetual contracts from diverging excessively from the spot price by that can occur due to higher demands in shorts or longs.
For more details regarding funding fees, please find the helpful links below.
Funding Overview : https://help.mycoinstory.com/hc/en-us/articles/360041059811-Funding-Overview

🎯 Bitcoin Trading Strategy with 100% Profitability


https://preview.redd.it/k2g3j0ajqph51.png?width=1300&format=png&auto=webp&s=f51122288180606dd46c3a4b0cfc7af2ebd844d0
Once MCS traders have a complete understanding of funding fees, you can start trading Bitcoin with 100% profit. This trading strategy is called the 1x Short Strategy. Due to the nature of the Bitcoin perpetual contract inverse product, if I take a 1x short position, my bitcoin quantity will vary depending on the bitcoin price, but strangely my assets will remain constant. In this situation, if you receive funding fees, you will continue to accumulate huge interest.
If you are new to the 1x short strategy, you may have not resonated with the details above. I will now explain the details one by one below.

👉 How Can My Assets Be The Same When The Bitcoin Quantity Fluctuates?


https://preview.redd.it/svtr2hwjqph51.png?width=1386&format=png&auto=webp&s=3a252e579956ea055ee3d97e270191b0edb20526
The above chart is a shows the BTC profit and loss when entering the 1x short position with 1 BTC at 10,000 dollars (blue line) and holding 1 BTC as it is (red line). When 1 BTC is held as it is, the amount of BTC does not change depending on the price change. However, if I took a 1x short position with 1 BTC for 10,000 dollars, my BTC profit or loss will fluctuate as shown in the in the blue line according to the change in BTC price. You don't have to worry too much if a 1x short position generates BTC profit or loss. Let's look at the chart below.

https://preview.redd.it/3vclmzhkqph51.png?width=1388&format=png&auto=webp&s=9a45d517a0264e8d215d94e4ca95877e8514630a
In the chart above, the blue line is a position of 1x short with 1 BTC at 10,000 dollars, and the red line is just holding 1 BTC. In this chart, you can see how the value of the asset changes according to the price change. In a glance, you can see that the value of 1 BTC changes according to the price changes. Surprisingly, the blue 1x short position line stays stable in value.
I believe that the more experienced MCS traders realized why the value of the 1x short remained constant. However if you encountered this for the first time, it may be a little difficult to understand. For everyone who did not completely understand, I will explain the 1x short strategy with an example.
💡 Example:
Suppose Hedgehog has 1 BTC in his MCS account and the current BTC price is $10,000. Hedgehog entered 10,000 short contracts with 1x leverage at $10,000 using 1 BTC as margin. Then this can be organized as follows.
Hedgehog's Original Capital = 1BTC Hedgehog's Original Fiat Capital = $10,000
Over time, the price of Bitcoin has reached $15,000. Many traders believe that for a short position, if the price increases, there will be a loss. However there is an exception for 1x short positions. Hedgehog's BTC quantity and asset value can be summarized as follows.
Short Position PNL Equation = (1/Average Closing Price - 1/Average Entry Price) * Quantity
As time has passed, the Bitcoin price is assumed to be $15,000, so the average end price = $15,000
Since Hedgehog entered 10,000 short contracts at $10,000 with 1x leverage, average entry price = $10,000, contract quantity = 10,000 contracts
If substituted, (1/15000 - 1/10000) * 10000 = -0.33333333BTC Hedgehog's loss in BTC is -0.33333333 BTC.
Hedgehog's current BTC Holdings = 1BTC - 0.33333333BTC = 0.66666667BTC
Hedgehog's Asset Value = 0.66666667BTC * $15,000 = $10,000.00005
Wait What‼️ Although the amount of BTC decreased, the price of bitcoin increased by the amount of lost BTC, and the asset value of Hedgehog remained the same.‼️
It is the same in the scenario when the bitcoin price falls. In the case of a 1x short position, if the bitcoin price falls, the amount of BTC increases accordingly, but the bitcoin price decreases, so the asset value of Hedgehog remains at about $10,000. Do you now understand how the 1x short strategy freezes the asset value?
Let's move onto the 2nd question.

👉 But Receiving Funding Fees For Short Position Isn't Guaranteed

If you have clearly established the concept of Funding Fee, you may think "Funding isn't always paid by longs". Funding fees are in some cases paid by longs and some cases paid by shorts. However, if you look at the major cryptocurrency derivatives exchanges Bitmex, Bybit, and MCS, if 90 funding fees are settled per month, more than 95% of them are statistically paid by long positions.

https://preview.redd.it/1x4ruzfmqph51.png?width=1063&format=png&auto=webp&s=941a7baa05ba76883315210276d94d42498f66bc

https://preview.redd.it/huecvdsnqph51.png?width=1066&format=png&auto=webp&s=a1c376f071f5a47c010164c0309a962a474b38ce
If you look at the two tables above, it shows the funding settlement history of BTC/USDT Perpetual Contracts on MCS. Since the first launch of MCS on June 15, the funding fee has been settled about 171 times. If you don't believe my words, you can check the MCS funding details directly through the link below.
MCS Funding Details : https://mycoinstory.com/contract/funding-history

https://preview.redd.it/ruzfyjioqph51.png?width=2324&format=png&auto=webp&s=97a3e5d9c87ce79f75411c9ee7c1178e379ae7da
Some of the world's major banks already have zero interest rates, and many are heading towards zero interest. The Korean bank installments are also 3-4% per year at best, and if you do not pay installments for a long time, you will also have to pay taxes. So I started to take a 1x short installment at MCS. In addition, since the interest on the funding fee comes in every 8 hours, real-time compounding is also possible.

https://preview.redd.it/i6oir60pqph51.png?width=2070&format=png&auto=webp&s=165e22eb6fbaeb6eb71dd2f8f5a3b19a0098750d
In particular, if you look at the funding history on July 28th, you have received an interest of 0.22% in one day. To expand the timeframe, that would be 6.6% of interest for the entire month and 79.2% per year!!! 79.2% INTEREST!! Moreover, if you keep increasing your 1x short position with real-time compounding, this is a risk-free, unconditional way to trade Bitcoin.
Try risk-free trading after familiarizing yourself with the 1x short strategy.

I am a Bitcoin margin trader, Hedgehog. Thank you for reading this post.
\For convenience purposes, trading fees and withdrawal fees are not included in the example of 1x short strategy in this article. The captured image of is an account Hedgehog actually holds with the 1x short savings.*

🔸 MCS Official Website : https://mycoinstory.com
🔸 MCS Telegram : https://t.me/mycoinstory_en

Traders ALWAYS come first on MCS.
Thank you.

MCS Official Twitter (EN): https://twitter.com/mycoinstory_mcs
MCS Official Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MyCoinStory.official
submitted by MyCoinStory to MyCoinStory [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

Discuss: Bitcoin currently has no value, because storing value requires utility first. Assets that aren't useful can't be used to store value.

This makes Bitcoin currently worth between $0.00 and $0.01 in my mind. Why? Because ten years of development and exposure has lead to less layer 1 utility than in 2010. That's pretty bad and it indicates that the network has been captured by bad actors that are only interested in the short-term financial gains it can bring. For those who are banking on the Lightning network... proposed layer 2 solutions do not compete against alternatives proposed by much more interesting projects like Ethereum and IOTA (which are both going for an industry-first approach, the only viable way to bring a complex technological product like cryptocurrencies to the masses).
"But... but... what about fiat money? What about gold? Both of those store value, right?" - Well, yes. Both store value, but both have actual utility too. Bitcoin doesn't because its utility is speculative, which requires much more unpredictable criteria. Starting with fiat money, what gives it utility is the fact that it's legal tender. It can be used to pay your taxes and buy literally anything in most given countries (that's not a hyperbole, in a lot of places the definition of 'legal tender' is that it has to be accepted by a seller in exchange for a good or service - they cannot refuse your fiat money).
For the case of gold, you probably don't know that about half of all gold on Earth is used to make jewelry, with about 15% used in random industries (from art to aerospace, electronics, etc.). Only about 35% is held in reserves, which means the price of gold is most likely between 1/3 and 1/2 speculation (which is fine for any commodity, zero speculation is impossible as long as it's traded). Comparatively, Bitcoin's speculation is damn near 100% of its price. If a major flaw is discovered, or another cryptocurrency is adopted as actual money before it, it's game over, Bitcoin is going back to literally zero. Not only that, but absolutely nothing indicates that it'll be a dominant force even in the medium-term (first-mover advantage is a joke considering how few people even know about cryptocurrency and how few people actually spend their Bitcoin).
Meanwhile, groups like Grayscale are just going full steam ahead with the purely speculative approach in trying to chuck Bitcoins at every random person, focusing only on ads showing how corrupt the current financial system is and equating that with Bitcoin being the money messiah. It's a circus and it bothers me that nobody seems to see it, but it has been obvious that things are engineered that way. On the same breath you have people demonizing every single decision that has been made in the history of finance, while on the other the same people are cheering at the prospect of any possible Bitcoin derivative asset imaginable. One day it's about transacting quickly and evading greedy bankers and their fees, the other it's about being 'digital gold'. Now I feel like this nonsense is engineered opacity and confusion: when you walk into a room where everyone is screaming, you can't understand a thing.
To conclude: Bitcoin is obviously not the future, so why are there so few candid discussions about it? My answer is that there are, but our media (this is both social and traditional media) is designed in a way that heavily favors confirmation bias. Furthermore, very few experts on this subject actually exist (would need both a deep understanding of crypto, finance and macroeconomics) and even fewer have adopted a truly neutral stance since there is so much money to be made scamming noobs. Things are quite simply too chaotic and uncertain for the people with real integrity to step in and set the record straight yet. What do you think?
submitted by PlusLiterature7 to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

[Rant] Ten harsh truth everyone on this subreddit needs to hear, or why this subreddit pisses me off

Two years ago, I had Bitcoins, Etther, liteecoin, Zccash and Rripple.
As of today, I only have bitcoins. I sold my Etther because the project is a mess. I sold my littecoin because why would I hold littecoins when I can hold bitcoins. I think Zccash is dead and rippple, well, it's just another fiat system.
All this to say, today, I have a sizeable amount of bitcoins and really no other crypto. I won't go into details, but I will say 90% of my assets are into bitcoins ATM, and I earn six figures a year and don't spend much.
Yet this subreddit pisses me off. Here's why:
1) Too many shills. Almost every day, on every post, there is a guy or several guys saying that bitcoin will be replaced by a """"""""""""""""better"""""""""""""" crypto. First of all, there are no better cryptos. Yes, you can fix some of the weakness in the bitcoin protocol, but in order to do that, you have to create other weaknesses.
For instance, take gold. Know how you... can't exactly pay for your groceries with gold? Or that if you sell gold, you'd be lucky to get 90% of market value at any store? Or how you have to store it, insure it, etc etc etc. Well, bitcoin is the same. Bitcoins is NOT a solution to all the world's problem. Bitcoin is BY FAR the most solid online cryptocurrency. It's been mercilessly attacked by EVERY SINGLE ENTITY ON EARTH and survived again and again.
Bitcoin is NOT: a) fast b) a way to buy coffee and pay instantly c) some kind of online purchasing token. You can buy stuff with bitcoins, but it can take weeks to confirm. This isn't a "bad" thing about bitcoins, it's just the way it's been designed.
"but but but muh etther is faster!" yes but etther has other drawbacks, it's not scalable, it's not the easier thing to mine, they haven't gotten their POS to work in years, it's not as reliable and protected, etc.
There are cryptos that are faster than bitcoins, but they all have their weakenesess. Bitcoin is ultra stable and protected against attacks. Many cryptos aren't.
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2) The Lightning network is a joke. I personally don't believe in it. I delved a bit into it and always thought it was a joke. The idea makes no sense, having nodes and "off the network" transactions might work for very small, rare transactions, but on a large scale, it simply will never work. If I send bitcoins, I want them sent through the main chain, period.
People here LOVE the lightning network but trust me, it will never work. No one wants to set up 20 app and wallets for the ONE shop that MIGHT accept it, especially when it bugs half the time.
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3) 99.9% of cryptos are worthless. Take for instance the Ravencoin. This shit is fuckign worthless! Why do people buy that crap? Obviously some traders grab it to speculate, but over the long term, ravencoin is going to 0. No one wants that shit. Would you invest in Zimbabwe money? Of course not. Just because it has reached higher price points and been valued at a huge market cap is MEANINGLESS. There are plenty of ways to pump useless shit crypto coins. I can't believe peopel fall for that. And ravencoin is one of the best altcoisn btw. The rest is even worse.
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4) YOU CANNOT PREDICT FUTURE BITCOIN PRICES BASED ON PAST ACTION! Stop trying to post graphs and all that BS doesn'T work! IT DOESNT WORK! You cannot predict how the bitcoins will move, PERIOD. If you could, you wouldn't be here, you would be rich.
STOP posting "last ten times bitcoin did this, xyz happened. NO ONE CARES.
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5) Bitcoin crash and w/e are obvious scam and no one really falls for that shit. They do trades between accounts they own to pump up the value. These are all scams. There's plenty of that on the pinksheets.
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6) Bitcoin is THE crypto. 99% of people have no fucking clue even what etther is, but have heard of bitcoin. Keep that in mind. My old mother knows what bitcoin is. My grandma fucking knows what bitcoin is. They saw some bitcoin ATM. They heard about it on the news. They know what it is.
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7) There is no "bitcoin 2.0" coming. You people might be a bit young (i'm older), but we heard that shit all the time growing up. "Google 2.0 is coming! Windows 2.0 is coming!" Guess what, 20 years later, google is still top, microsoft is still top, and there's no fucking iphone killer.
There's no bitcoin killer coming neither. Bitcoin is it. Its been "it" for ten years and this is as good as it gets.
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8) Bitcoins prices are too low. Right now, bitcoin is valued at $17B. Remove the lost bitocins and we are mostly looking at $12B. Twelve billions is FUCKING NOTHING in the grand scheme of things! Piece of shit Payapl is valued at $200B+ and it's a fucking scam, see paypalsucks.com
Are you trying to tell me bitcoin is not even worth 10% of paypal? Even with all the miners, website, etc etc etc. Yeah, I don't think so.
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9) There is a ton of room for growth for bitcoins. Specifically, there is tremendous growth opportunity for an independant financial system. One that doesnt depend on the FED that just printed $5,000,000,000,000 (LITERALLY printed, they admitted it) out of thin air to pay sure their buddies wouldn't go bankrupt (airlines, banks, etc). Look at a 5 years graph for bitcoins, did it go down? Compare it to USD and inflation, which ROBS YOU blind.
_ ___________________________
10) Bitcoin is the best investment today. I cannot repeat that enough. It has so many attributes that make it attractive I just don't get why people don't put at least 10% of their savings into it. Last runup it went from what, 2k to 20k? This time it could go to 10k to 100k.
Not saying its likely, but what if it does? I mean it's happened before, time and time again. Look at annual return for bitcoins in the last 10 years, it crushed anything because unlike cash, you CANNOT PRINT UNLIMITED bitcoins. In fact, bitcoins are getting rarer and rarer, and the volume is not going down. Bitcoin is THE money to get.
People say "but its pricey" Yeah no shit, try to order something from someone overseas, see how much the fees rekt you. And then taxes. Bitcoins is unrelated to all of that. There will come a day where you won't have to deal with US and bullshit Fintrac altogether.
If you wanna open a bank account, you get asked 100 questions, meanwhile banks like UBS and credit suisse allow big drug traffickers and owners of child soldiers to launder BILLIONS without any consequences. So fuck that.
All in all, bitcoin's got this, and I'm tired of disinformation and shills for shitcoins no one gives a shit about (like nano, no one cares about this shit) posting every day without response.
/endrant.
submitted by graydoggames to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Welcome to Freetown

It started with a sign. It stood at the entrance of the small community simple but clear:
Welcome to Freetown.
Enter only if you respect the Life, Liberty and Property of all here.
Murderers, tyrants and thieves will be shot.
The message was a practical one, not inspired by history or ideology but by clarity of purpose. It enumerated the things that would be defended with deadly force and warned away those that would harm them. As time went by and neighbours from time to time suggested alterations or additions to the sign it was always argued that brevity had power. It was unnecessary to explain in detail all the different types of property owned in the community and how it could be destroyed or stolen. It was understood by all what harm to life meant, what need was there to specify differences in degree between murder and assault. Liberty being a more philosophical concept was always harder to define, but all agreed that a good rule of thumb was that if someone came around telling anybody what to do with their property or their life shouldn’t be welcomed and, if telling escalated to threats or orders should promptly be shown the door.
In any case even given the small number of neighbours at the time there was never unanimity to change it. If it’s difficult to get a handful of people to agree to anything, it could only get harder as their number grew. Certainly many would have liked to add more rules. Most in the community were Christian and wouldn’t have looked askance at the ten commandments… but freedom of religion seemed to most an important part of Liberty. Remembering the Sabbath, honouring your parents and not coveting could surely be left to individual consciences, whereas stealing and killing were pretty clearly community problems. So after many arguments Life, Liberty and Property remained as the common denominators.
In time it grew to be a social contract of sorts, first in an unspoken, implicit way, but later it was written in the rules of the homeowners association which all new buyers and builders had to sign. So in many ways it was far more real a social contract and far more binding an agreement than any constitution ever approved by “representatives” but never actually accepted by the people, never mind all the people.
The sign also had a selective effect on new residents. Some did not like the idea of violence, even defensive violence and would rather not buy a house or live in a place that so overtly threatened. The idea of many of your neighbours being armed simply did not appeal to many. Others did not believe in private property, but those that would have unlawfully occupied empty houses thought twice when they saw the sign and headed for easier pickings. Of course there are plenty of rich communists and their lack of respect for private property never stopped them from personally owning it... but this was no luxury community, at least when it started, so politicians and bureaucrats were rare.
The first big change came in the police strike and riots. As cops were increasingly paid less, later and in depreciating currency they started to protest more, work less and turn back to some old ways of extortion. Mostly they just did not answer calls, but sometimes when they did they were expensive and less than helpful. So the community was quick to become self-reliant for protection, hiring a private guard for the main entrance and quickly coordinating a group of armed neighbours as backup should it be needed. When the first riots came more than a dozen neighbours stood behind the guard with enough weaponry in plain sight to deter anything short of an army. So the looting passed them by. Car burnings, break-ins, assaults and all types of chaos and vandalism happened in nearby neighbourhoods. The police were busy protesting for back pay. People took note. Similar signs started going up in many communities that had seen the difference between trusting authority and trusting your neighbours. One neighbourhood that actually shared the main road and access, simply asked to merge. Over the years the community would grow to ten times its size. However that was dwarfed by how far its example reached as thousands of neighbourhoods followed it. Actually the neighbours simply could not tell if they were being emulated… or if other people had just followed their own logic and reached similar common sense solutions to simple problems.
The second big change came with the banking crisis. As savings were wiped out first by deflation then by inflation the community, just as the rest of the country, had to start saving again from almost nothing. This time they would not make the same mistake again, they would not work tirelessly for years while trusting the government and banks to secure the currency and their savings. They began to use Bitcoin and physical gold for their savings so that they could be personally responsible for the security of their wealth. They discovered another advantage of personal responsibility: privacy. Eventually most trade was done in hard assets and again the example spread far. Government money, fiat money was only used to pay government services… and as the first depreciated the second kept losing quality. “Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s” well fiat money most definitely belonged to the government and they were welcome to have it.
Some attempts were made by tax collectors to exact payments in hard assets and in some places they were allowed to do so. Others resisted with more or less force. Soon they learned which places to avoid for fear of tarring and feathering, or worse. Anyone who wanted to keep their property from the hands of the ever more rapacious and bankrupt government also learnt the lesson: keep your real assets in a Free Zone or lose them. It’s not that the government couldn’t muster, if pressed, the force to enter the a Free Zone and loot… but it was rare for a reason: Agents were unwilling to take risks for the meager pay they were receiving so the only way to make it worth their while was to let them share in the spoils. Any illusions that they were law enforcers went out the window after the first few times that happened. Honest cops quit. The ones still willing to loot were viewed by most citizens as what they were, a violent gang. They were too few and too cowardly to face any resistance.
Police reform would come too late. Private security backed by citizen militias would prove cheaper both in peaceful and violent times, as well as far more respectful of the Life, Liberty and Property of its customers.
Tax income withered. The death spiral was too fast and paralysing for the government to stop. The government would continue to pretend to offer services and a few people would pretend to pay for them. It would become obvious that there was nothing magical about a monopolistic administration that allowed it to build roads or schools more efficiently than local institutions, companies or communities. In fact it was hard to imagine how anybody had thought that the monopoly could ever do so with better quality than what consumers could expect from competing providers.
Some people rejected this way of doing things and formed their own socialistic communes, syndicates and associations. Many saw a kibbutz revival in the making. Did people in the Free zones object? No. Live and let live. If they want communal property they were welcome to share theirs… as long as they did not try to take ours. Unsurprisingly most people preferred not to live in a commune.
Localism, self-reliance and secure property rights eventually brought unprecedented prosperity, well-being and progress. But that was later, after we survived the invasion...
submitted by flix2 to GoldandBlack [link] [comments]

QUADRIGA 2.0 = COINBERRY?

TL;DR- A "Canadian" crypto exchange has been blowing off customers while their accounts and funds are frozen. Their company isn't trading in Canada, their PR hlooks grandiose but in fact isn't impressive at all, and they are now lying to customers about the reason for the delays.
FULL BREAKDOWN
Coinberry uses "trusted by the Canadian Government" as their main call-to-action and as leverage to gain your business due to their partnership with two municipalities (Richmond Hill and Innisfil township) Townships are NOT part of the Canadian Federal Government, they are municipalities. Municipalities are autonomous. The Canadian federal government and LOCAL government aren't the same thing, that is fraudulent representation.
The mayor of Innisfil has been known to accept gifts from companies trying to get in his favour. Only 5% of CANADIANS- not Innisfil residents, hold cryptocurrency. So, in a town of 36K people, where the majority of the population is 50+ in age, how many are likely to hold bitcoin? Coinberry is the only one benefiting from this; they get to say they've partnered with a township, and if anyone actually wanted to pay property tax in Bitcoin then they need to sign up with Coinberry.
The special information package tells Innisfil residents that "Coinberry has fully supportive, transparent and CDIC insured segregated banking in Canada (page 2/26) A quick Google search will tell you that's false - the CDIC does NOT cover digital currencies as of April 30th, 2020. The document linked stating this was made in 2019. How much did this mayor get paid to lie to his citizens?! I doubt he'd do it for free.
They leverage being PIPEDA compliant, yet all you need is a self assessment tool. It's based on opinion, yet it's their first selling point. It's a garbage selling point that gives false confidence to potential clients.
FINTRAC REGISTRY AND THEIR SHELL COMPANY IN MALTA
They claim to be the only FINTRAC registered company. Nope. A quick search of other crypto exchanges in the FINTRAC lookup proves that claim wrong: https://www10.fintrac-canafe.gc.ca/msb-esm/public/msb-search/search-by-name/
Their privacy policy mentions a parent company. Their parent company is listed on FINTRAC as CB INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, and is based in Malta. For those of you who aren't aware, Malta is well known for being the best place to set up shell companies in order to avoid taxes and protect CEOs from lawsuits after "their" money. This was NOT the case for Kraken, Newton or Shakepay. Only Coinberry feels they need a shell company in another country.
They have 4 companies listed, all Coinberry. All 4 listings show Coinberrys agent activities listed as money transferring, and 2 of them are listed as agents of CB INTERNATIONAL LIMITED (the parent company). This parent company is located in Malta and has listed its activities as foreign exchange and money transferring. This means all of the exchanges happening are actually happening in MALTA not Canada.
They seem to be the only exchange (with Canadian HQ) doing this: Kraken, Newton and Shakepay list their agent activities as foreign exchange dealing, and all are registered IN CANADA. This implies your money is also staying in Canada on their platforms.
Where there is smoke, there is fire.
edit: added a TL;DR, took out unnecessary sentences, cleaned up wording. I was pissed when I wrote this. I just want to see Coinberry suits come clean about the delays. Tell people why you can't get their money back as soon as you said you would, because this only making crypto even scarier for new adopters.
submitted by cosmicariel to Scams [link] [comments]

Do I Have To Pay Taxes on Bitcoin Should you pay tax on Bitcoin? USA 2017 Bitcoin Taxes! Do you have to pay TAXES? *mystery* Is Bitcoin Legal In India & Paying Taxes on Bitcoin Trading in India If You Own Bitcoin, Here's How Much You Owe In Taxes ...

It is not unusual to have a tax on the reality of bitcoin. But let’s take a look at bitcoin’s presence and earn money using bitcoin. As with most, gold merchants pay taxes to the administration because they make money by trading gold, just like businesspeople who also pay taxes to the state. So, it is only fair that bitcoin users pay a tax. Bitcoin taxes can be a bummer, but at least you can deduct capital losses on bitcoin, just as you would for losses on stocks or bonds. These losses can offset other capital gains on sales. Bitcoin.tax and Cointracking.info will help you figure out your transaction history, how much you owe and how to fill out the Schedule D (1040) form for reporting capital gains or losses. 3. Don't If You Are Mining Bitcoin, You Need to Report This as Income. If you are mining Bitcoin or any other virtual currency, you need to know how to pay taxes on Bitcoin received or whichever other cryptocurrencies you are mining. According to the IRS, miners are required to record and report any earnings received from mining. Crypto-to-crypto trading (buying ETH with BTC) Using crypto to obtain goods and services Any earning/income received in cryptocurrency is taxable, including mining or wages paid in bitcoin, etc‍ ‍On the other hand, what does not constitute a taxable event? ‍ You do not trigger a taxable event: If you buy crypto with USD or fiat money

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Do I Have To Pay Taxes on Bitcoin

Should you pay tax on bitcoin/ cryptocurrency? Do you have a lot of questions about it? This is a question and answer section of should we pay tax on bitcoin! I have put more information about ... Almost no one seems to pay, but whether you've used bitcoin as an investment or as a currency you owe taxes on it. ... but whether you've used bitcoin as an investment or as a currency you owe ... Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency is dominating the news. Many people are excited about Bitcoin, but do not understand the tax implications. Check out this video on taxation related to Bitcoin. IRS And Cryptocurrency - Bitcoin Tax Law: We try to make sense of the IRS legal framework on bitcoin cryptocurrency and taxes. IRS and Cryptocurrency do not play well together. Bitcoin Taxes! Do you have to pay TAXES? *mystery* Crypto Central News. ... Get Trading Signals and Alerts on Altcoins ... How To Do Taxes For Bitcoin: Cryptocurrency - Duration: ...

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