Why Day Trading is the Best Strategy in 2020? - BOZ - CFD

First day trading on CFD with real money - How my day went

Hey guys,
So I wanted to share my experience on CFD since it was something that was kinda scary to me. I finally put in 1000$ on my CFD account this morning. Before that I was training on demo mode and my strategy was working pretty well.
MY STRATEGY:
So I'm not familiar with leverage yet so I started asking myself what would be the way that I'm the most comfortable trading with leverage. I started looking for a stock that consistently grew since even a 1% a day rise could be good with leverage. That's when I realized that trading with an ETF could work. So I started looking at the S&P 500 and running the numbers. In the last year, on average, there is a a 2,47$ gap between the low and the close of SPY. So I though that if I could figure out the low each day, buy in and sell at the end of the day, I would consistently make money. After 1 week in the demo account, with a 10k practice amount, it worked 4/5 times giving me +300$.
MY FIRST DAY:
Today was Powell's speech. Basically he didn't say anything new. So the bull trend had no reason to stop today.
9h30: I monitor the opening of the S&P 500. It starts with a slight dip. Unusual since most the time, there is a buy-in at open. But since there wasn't a sell-off at the previous close, I'm thinking it's nothing too alarming.
10h: first dip. I'm hesitant. The last few days the first dip was followed by a deeper one around 11h.
11h: Still no dip. It even hits new highs. I'm starting to rethink my plan. Just the day before, the S&P 500 ran up all day with practically no dips.
Then I notice a trend: the price seems to "hug" the EMA 20. I wait for the price to drop under the EMA 20 and decide to jump in with 14 shares.
https://preview.redd.it/9qp5q476flj51.png?width=939&format=png&auto=webp&s=5e96a03713169869cf1a18badac5246e7af26102
Well that didn't go as planned. The price kept running down, further and further from the EMA. At that point I made a minor mistake by not jumping out when my plan didn't go as expected.
I was lucky enough to hit a break-even price and jumped out of the trade at 0. Scary.
I decide to take a little break to clear my mind and come back 30 minutes later.
SECOND TRADE:
At this point I realize the price is breaking a resistance that I had noticed earlier (the day's high). I think it's a good signal for a significant break out towards higher highs.
https://preview.redd.it/6v6j5obxflj51.png?width=1312&format=png&auto=webp&s=8bef020f8689c862478e1bb2d50e0ef5e8e66cb8
Well I was wrong again. The price goes down, and down, and down.
Luckily, I had taken a rather small position of 2 shares since I was kinda shook by my first unsuccessful trade. At this point I didn't really know what to do other than watch the price run down.
I decide to buy positions on the way down. 2 shares each time during the downward trend (circled in black):

https://preview.redd.it/lebrwuk2hlj51.png?width=1312&format=png&auto=webp&s=50dee1eca7c2fc543453daa2ff29722ee34c6caf
The SPY keeps going down, and I nearly have no more money. My live result is -20$ and I'm starting to think that I will keep the positions open over night and that tomorrow I might get lucky.
At this point I'm starting to get a better idea of the support and resistances of the day. I figure if the price goes bellow the day's low, then I would have to accept the loss and sell.
But then 1pm come along and we finally get a nice bounce. I'm up +4$. I sell all my positions and call it a day.
The day is not over yet when I'm writing this but I obviously could have sold later. In hindsight, if I had just followed my initial plan (buy at open, or at day's low, sell at close) I would have done much better (maybe 10$ profit?).

https://preview.redd.it/6yqr1boijlj51.png?width=1280&format=png&auto=webp&s=a025e9d56fafdc16616bfc489fcd1fec34cadf70
WHAT I LEARNED:
-However well you performed with fake money, I will be completely different with real money.
-Any plan/strategy you had before hand will disappear once the market opens.
-You will make many mistakes. You can't just watch YT videos on trading signals and apply them. No matter what the YT gurus tell you, It's not easy to day trade.
-Spreads kill your profits. When I bough in, there was a 0.25$ difference with the actual price and when I sold it was 0.10$! Maybe the spread decreases with low volatility?
I hope somebody will find some useful info here! I will answer questions if you have any.
If people want to give me advice, be welcome! I'm a beginner!
submitted by ghiblis to trading212 [link] [comments]

Sharing With the Community

LONG TIME lurker, first time posting. Profitable trader here wondering how I’d give something back to this community without saying, “buy x company at $1 and sell at $1.2”, or giving up the secrets of my strategy.
I’m from a banking/arbitrage trading/risk analysis family...would anyone be interested in information around those areas in regard to day-trading?
EDIT: I’ll have a bit of a write up tomorrow and stick it up here. Thinking I’ll post something on the arbitrage topic first as that’s probably the most interesting/provocative.
EDIT2: Alright, here goes.
Instead of an arbitrage specific write up I want to talk about something else first—inspired by TheLoneComic’s comment. This is just what came out when I sat down to write. If it’s well received I’ll keep writing. This will probably be most beneficial to beginner traders with small capital and individuals struggling with stop losses...I can also go into more detail on this post, I’m typing this up within the time frame I have.
Arbitrage traders (also my background) don’t think the world of day traders as individuals—or at least ALL the traders I know don’t. Saying that, the trading world as a whole LOVE day-traders. The brokers do as they get commissions and everyone else does as 80-90% of you lose your money to the swirling pool of money in the market. This dislike or “looking down the nose” isn’t all warranted, I’ll admit, but the trading world has to be filled with many losers—many of whom, unfortunately, are just average Joes or Janes trying to free themselves from the wage-cage. This is a noble pursuit but most people shouldn’t, or don’t, require leverage to be profitable and are in fact endangering their capital by doing so—not to mention cutting their career short. This probably the most mind-boggling aspect of the typical day-trader. The term, “trade within your means” springs to mind.
The main point of contention within my arbitrage world is those hung up in the world of technical analysis and how reliable it actually is. Keep in mind these are firms with super-computers that execute and exit trades in the blink of an eye, searching all day across entire sectors for price disparity. There’s little room for human error and emotion...Arbitrage companies are incredibly profitable for this reason.
I don’t really want to get in a debate over TA as I know how emotionally invested people are in it. I do want to get beginners to rethink how they buy and sell. I will say this, broadly speaking, TA subscribers tend to mistake their success on patterns when the real winner is discipline and strategy—that’s why I like to read this sub. if you don’t have these you will lose...the same is true for all areas of business. We could easily transplant these people into any industry and I’m sure they’d thrive.
I believe there’s a missing link in the arsenal of the day-trader. Particularly for the beginner. And this missing link is combining Share Trading and CFD trading. This is a powerful stepping stone for those who want to wade into the rough ocean of CFD. Especially because it will help you better understand risk management and price movement.
I’d like to propose a strategy to the 80-90% of strugglers and losers—not the disciplined with sound strategy as they don’t need much help. I believe this is a far better way to enter into the world of trading and will give you a better understanding of leverage and when/how to better utilise it.
First, we’re going to start trading within our means, as protecting our capital is vital. We’re going to do this by combining Share trading and CFD trading. Specifically, we need to look for markets wherein there’s no restrictions on trading both CFD and buying shares outright. This means you’ll also need a broker that allows you to do both.
Next step is your strategy, PLEASE NOTE, you’re still going to develop your own strategy and work on your discipline so spend plenty of time on this...the only thing that is going to change is how you BUY/SELL.
Don’t mean to do this to you all but I’ll have to leave this one as a to be continued...I’ve run out of time and will continue later today should there still be interest.
EDIT 3:
I’ve got another short period here to continue on.
I would like to share what I believe is the true value in leveraging for a day-trader and I’ll tie it in to where I left off. My algorithm will spit out roughly 20 strong trades a day across many different markets. Some of these trades will require being open for several days, weeks, or even a month (I know, this takes them outside the realm of a “day trade”). Herein lies a risk of capital being tied up in multiple long term holds and open positions. Two things here on why I like to actually use buying stocks as a DT strategy: brokers usually charge you a fee to leave a position open over multiple days...this cost adds up—especially if like me you set a price target and don’t exit a trade until it is hit. And secondly, clear stop loss positions are not always clear. So my solution was to just BUY shares of the stock, commodity, or ETFs if I’d projected the trade to be longer than a day or if I couldn’t find a solid stop-loss point (please note my average position size is $15,000-$20,000 per trade so I don’t need the leverage to make money).
I could write a whole essay on hedging, as it can be very powerful when combined with this method correctly. It’s roll to play is so important that I will have to divulge more at some point...maybe in a future post.
I use leverage mostly to hedge and play some short game while I’ve got my longer term, bigger plays in the ground. Leverage is not a method I use for playing large positions for quick money. I think this is a far better attitude for beginners as the emphasis is always going to be on price targets and exit points, risk management, and money management/allocation.
More to come.
EDIT 4:
To summarise my viewpoint, those seeking to enter the world of trading should first learn to share trade and hedge. Learn to walk before you run. Not only will you gain better experience, be more controlled and methodical, be less frustrated and have a lower chance of bottoming your account, you’ll also have another weapon in your arsenal for when you decide to use leverage. Learning this skill will also allow you to understand when you can increase your stake/risk.
Some parts of this have been left a bit vague due to either time constraints or they require a thread/discussion of their own for further explanation. If there is anything I need to dive into a bit deeper please let me know. I’d like to post another thread on hedging and a “turning $1000 into $2000” play-by-play if such things are allowed? Also thinking about posting some of my algorithm’s picks, price entry, and price target. I like discussing such things but don’t have a very wide circle outside of work to share with at the moment.
submitted by wjm2018 to Daytrading [link] [comments]

Binary Options Recovery: Scammed Traders, Fake Brokers, and Funds Recovery

Binary Options Recovery: Scammed Traders, Fake Brokers, and Funds Recovery
Following the “permanent temporary” measures against binary options and CFDs (contract for difference), the body in charge implements its own set of limitations that simply forbids regulated houses to offer such product in the UK, hence increasing the risk of pushing retails traders towards illegal brokers and outright scams. Fortunately, a new solution is now available to UK traders via a new United Kingdom Financial regulatory ruling.
More scrutiny from UK banks about financial transactions, even to binary optionsIn short, banks will have to take more responsibility about the financial transactions they facilitate. This new ruling should lead to the creation of a new code of conduct that will help defrauded people to have their funds recovered by their bank, unless it is proven they acted recklessly.
As a popular Financial blog puts, it, “It is likely that should a bank or credit card company be either impersonated by a fraudster in order to gain money, or trick a client into depositing, and the bank allows the transfer, a client will be able to take recourse.
The broad protection should kick for many online scheme and scams, whether it is fake investment companies, fraudulent binary options brokers or those scammers who promise to help you recover your stolen funds…only to steal from you once again. On the other hands, it means the banks will be more likely to forbid transactions to legit businesses, such as reputable cryptocurrency exchanges or honest smart options platforms.
The regulating bodies and financial institutions are taking a number of measures to prevent financial fraud. Binary options trading, in particular, is being controlled with a greater degree of robustness to protect the unwary general public being drawn into a situation where they suffer financial losses. Many hundreds of people around the world are targeted each day.
![img](prwn4ha2ecf51 " ")
Frequently they are novice investors who are unfamiliar with the markets and do not recognize that the so-called trading platform and its way of working are actually bogus. The individual only realizes the extent of the fraud when eventually when the fraudsters finally decide that there is no more money to be had and shut down the account and promptly vanish without trace.
Spotting Fraudulent Binary Options Broker
Some lawyers in the financial fraud division are very familiar with the pattern of behaviour demonstrated by the fraudulent brokers and the distress caused by their dealings with inexperienced investors. There is a track of record of recovery in relation to financial fraud and has a number of strategies and tactics to compel the fraudulent broker or associated financial service providers to restore funds to those who have been deceived.
Needless to say, the fraudsters are accomplished at hiding their tracks and frequently there are myriad inter-connected limited liability companies, often some are registered in different countries, with some dormant and some active. It is hardly surprising if the complexity of the situation results in a failure to discover a single person who can be challenged and held accountable.
However, there are various channels financial fraud lawyers use when attempting to retrieve money for clients and each avenue is investigated. Whilst an individual may be alarmed and confused at the prospect of navigating through the complex structures that have been deliberately set up to confuse, Financial fraud lawyers are usually quite familiar with strategies fraudsters use, and frequently can steer a course to the recovery of some or all of the lost money.
https://preview.redd.it/daa505b3ecf51.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b27aa7697b0bf1afbd238964166ce40c693db2e3
The step of last resort, legal action, is understandably daunting for a person who often has lost significant amounts of money to the fraudulent brokers. It is fully understandable that such a situation will leave the victim decidedly risk-averse. There have been experiences with class actions against the fraudulent brokers and has developed links with litigation funding organizations in order to offset the risk in respect of class actions.
The lessons that can be drawn from the experiences of those individuals who have had the misfortune of losing their investments to fraudsters are to be extremely cautious. Always consider every offer or investment for at least 48 hours before making a decision, a genuine broker will understand the caution that a new investor will view a proposition.
All investments carry a risk and anything that promises a return on your initial investment seems to be significantly higher than normal it is almost certainly not to be trusted. Do not allow yourself to be hurried into a decision, it is highly unlikely that an authentic broker would try to rush you into an investment, especially if you demonstrated reluctance; their reputation would suffer by such behaviour.
You can now recover all money lost to bitcoin, binary options, cryptocurrency, investment, scam by hiring any one of these Verified Wealth Recovery Experts.
To recover money lost to binary options, forex, bitcoins, cryptocurrency, and investment, get all the information you need here; https://bitcoinbinaryoptionsreview.com/binary-options-uk-scammed-traders-fake-brokers-and-funds-recovery/
submitted by sinenyoku to u/sinenyoku [link] [comments]

Why Beginners Should Avoid Leverage and Where to Direct Their Attention

The temptation to trade on margin can be quite overwhelming for beginners. Especially if you've entered into the trading world through watching others making huge gains. There are better places to direct one's energy in the journey to profitability.
The reason to avoid leverage is because, for small-cap investors, it's a near certain way to lose your capital and get completely frustrated with the trading experience. Put it this way, there are too many factors fighting against you in the market for you to be profitable as a beginner fresh off paper-trading--especially if you're only employing technical analysis as your strategy.
[please note it is not impossible but it is incredibly rare]
We should be asking ourselves why we want to expose beginners to significantly more risk whilst they only have the resources and knowledge of an elementary small-cap retail investor. We should be encouraging another journey that will teach all the lessons of live trading whilst reducing their risk. We wouldn't encourage a friend to search for a home to buy or rent outside their means, nor would we search for a vehicle that we couldn't afford to run...so why should we trade shares that we can't afford to buy? "To make money!?", you may retort...but think about this, there is a way to trade within our means that will make us money and will reduce our risk exponentially. Is it unreasonable to say, that our positions in the market should reflect our knowledge, skill, risk tolerance, and experience?
The best place for beginners to direct their energy is in share trading. The principles of Day Trading can still be applied through Share Trading. You can still develop your DT edge and strategy, you can still set market entry and exit points, you can still trade live. The primary difference being significantly reduced risk. If you treat it as if it was a CFD account you will increase the longevity of your trading journey--potentially all way to your trading goals. This method will aid in building solid risk management, self-control, and strategy implementation.
I am more than happy to explain in greater detail how these set ups would work and operate. I want to see more beginners succeed in the trading world...the ratio of losing traders is far too high and the advice is often too complex.
submitted by wjm2018 to Daytrading [link] [comments]

UK Guide to US Options Trading

This is guide to US options trading from the UK, because I've seen countless requests of people browsing in /ukinvesting, /options, /wallstreetbets etc. about this.
First thing's first - no part of this post is to be taken as financial advice. It is a guide on how to start options trading from the UK. Options/CFD trading is a high-risk activity and most retail traders lose money.

1. CFDs vs. Options

So getting started, options and contracts for difference (CFDs) are both financial derivatives - they derive their values from an underlying security e.g. stock, indices, currency, commodities. Long story short, CFDs do not have an expiration and options do; and at the option expiration date, options give the opportunity to buy/sell the underlying (e.g. stock) at the agreed strike price. CFDs are highly directional (delta) trades where positions require ongoing financing fees by a broker, whereas options strategies allow the trader to trade time decay (theta) as well as market volatility (vega). Options provide greater flexibility in trading strategies (time/volatility trading as well as direction); however, due to this, the more complex strategies can be difficult to understand.
Spread betting allows a literal directional bet of an underlying by a certain date. It is most similar naked options - i.e. if your position moves against you enough, your broker may forcibly close your position unfavourably and/or margin call you for extra cash ("you can lose more than your initial deposit"). With options/CFDs, you can define risk by specifying a profitability range (spreads) instead to avoid this scenario. Due to spread betting being so close to gambling, it is treated as such in the UK in terms of taxation - gains are tax free. I will also add here that CFDs/options can also be used in this manner (gambling, with subsequent margin calls etc.), and that CFD brokers tend to understate the risks of these strategies, whilst almost all options brokers require elevated permissions to seek out this level of risk - this is because blowing through margin presents a risk to the broker and they would rather have commissions without the risks of the brokerage going bust. The lowest level of permissions still allows you to buy extremely highly leveraged OTM options without margin, as your max loss is limited to the amount you paid for those options.

2. Brokers

Given that options effectively open up two additional aspects of trading (time/volatility) and require additional regulatory oversight compared to CFDs/spreadbetting, there is basically no options market in the UK - the only brokers at this time are IG/Saxo, and they only do vanilla options on Forex/Indices/Commodities. Everyone else only does CFDs and/or stock (T212, Freetrade, IG, Plus500 etc.). To engage in true stock options trading, the only choice is to open an international/US brokerage account.
The two that are accessible to UK investors are Interactive Brokers (IB) and TastyWorks. Both are reputable brokers and have strong insurances for cash & securities held with them.

3. Opening an account

I will walk through some of the aspects of funding and operating a TastyWorks account from the UK, as this is my recommendation if you're here looking for a cheap way to get started.
Opening a free account on TastyWorks is easy as they are used to foreign traders (form filling within 20-60 mins - you will need a photo of proof of ID and address). It typically takes 1 day for cash accounts and 2-3 days for margin accounts to be ready for funding. My referral link if you feel this guide deserves the effort is: https://start.tastyworks.com/#/login?referralCode=GD9EGGNZYZ. (mods, happy to remove this is this guide is deemed low effort)
The account types are:

4. Funding the Account

Since trading US options is done in USD, the account must be funded in USD. As international traders, deposits must be "By Wire", assuming you do not have a US bank account - full instructions for the "By Wire" method will show up when you are approved to fund your account. With TastyWorks, UK traders have 3 options at time of writing, going from highest to lowest fee:
1) Starling Bank: ~1% commission (+flat fee TBC?)
2) CurrencyFair: typical ~0.75% commission +$20 flat fee
3) TransferWise/Revolut + UK USD Account: ~0.5% commission +$20 flat fee
TastyWorks does not accept third party transfers (accounts not in your name), so services such as Revolut and TransferWise (inc. borderless) do not work directly
4.1 Starling Bank
With Starling Bank, you can do an international wire from a GBP account directly. Easy online bank setup and probably fastest way to get started, especially if you already bank with them. Note: Starling Bank is rejecting transfers to TastyWorks 'as it sits out of our international payment provider's risk appetite' (as of 11th May) - waiting for updates
Note that other routes include a $20 flat fee charged by intermediate banks before the transfer reaches TastyWorks. Haven't got confirmation that this route is charged or if Starling includes it within their higher fee.
4.2 CurrencyFair
TastyWorks have approved transfers via CurrencyFair with a guide at: https://support.tastyworks.com/support/solutions/articles/43000435321-can-i-use-currencyfair-to-fund-my-account-
Easy to get started, but a couple hoops to jump through to confirm your transaction to TastyWorks via email.
Note that the $20 flat fee is for an intermediary bank to take their cut between CF and TastyWorks, but that is not mentioned on the CurrencyFair website.
4.3 USD account + TransferWise/Revolut
The cheapest option is to set up a USD currency account and transfer through that.
The account of choice is the Barclays USD Foreign Currency account - you need a current account with them to be able to open the USD account. HSBC also have an offering, but not had this route confirmed.
Once the USD account is open, you can transfer into it using Revolut/TransferWise (cheap) and then international (wire) transfer from Barclays account to TastyWorks (free!). Note that the Barclays USD account is still a UK bank account, so you'll need to use a SWIFT transfer from Revolut/TransferWise to turn your GBP into USD.
Note that the $20 flat fee is for an intermediary bank to take their cut between Barclays and TastyWorks, but that is not mentioned on the Barclays website.
4.4 Withdrawals
To withdraw funds, do the opposite for a deposit, noting that $45 will be charged by TastyWorks per withdrawal.

5. Getting Started

I highly, highly recommend TastyWork's education centre and their TastyTrade videos, especially if you are new to this.
Otherwise, once funded, it's as simple as downloading the app on mobile, using the browser trading screen, or downloading their full desktop platform.
That's it for the guide - happy trading, and if there are any questions, feel free to get in touch and I'll edit the answers in here. I want this to be a resource because I've helped many people get started, and it would be good to have it all in one place!
submitted by TheScotchEngineer to UKInvesting [link] [comments]

EURUSD NUDGES HIGHER POST FED CHAIR POWELL’S COMMENTS

EURUSD NUDGES HIGHER POST FED CHAIR POWELL’S COMMENTS


The single currency edged higher versus its US counterpart in the early Asian hours on Friday, post FED Chair Powell’s comments. The underlying sentiments were supported after US Federal Reserve hinted that interest rates will remain close to zero in the foreseeable future despite surge in the pace of inflation.
As of now, the currency pair is trading at 1.1866, representing gains of 0.38%.
Coming onto the previous session, the currency pair witnessed a two way price action and finally settle the day in red territory at 1.1821, with slight loss of 0.07%. Initially, the currency pair surged to the intraday high of 1.1902 level as a kneejerk reaction to the speech of US FED Chairman Jerome Powell at the Jackson Hole Symposium as he indicated towards a shift in the average target inflation to run beyond the set 2%. Powell further reiterated that the pace of US economic recovery would be gradual amid ongoing coronavirus pandemic. However, the pair quickly lost steam as lingering US-China trade concerns and coronavirus worries overshadowed the highly aggressive growth strategy by the Federal Reserve.
Moving ahead, investors can take cues from the US Core PCE Price Index data, Chicago PMI and Personal Spending reports as it could lead to volatility in the pair.
Risk Disclaimer: The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs.
submitted by FXView to FXview [link] [comments]

Has anybody here made consistent profit with CFDs?

I've been using the practice account for a while, and multiple times I've obliterated my money to dust. I'm going to blame market volatility. I will also blame ghosts, because I swear every time I sell/buy the market moves in the opposite direction.
Anybody here trade regularly with CFDs real money? Do you make good profit?
submitted by Scutterbum to trading212 [link] [comments]

Why Beginners Should Avoid Leverage and Where to Direct Their Attention

The temptation to trade on margin can be quite overwhelming for beginners. Especially if you've entered into the trading world through watching others making huge gains. There are better places to direct one's energy in the journey to profitability.
The reason to avoid leverage is because, for small-cap investors, it's a near certain way to lose your capital and get completely frustrated with the trading experience. Put it this way, there are too many factors fighting against you in the market for you to be profitable as a beginner fresh off paper-trading--especially if you're only employing technical analysis as your strategy.
[please note it is not impossible but it is incredibly rare]
We should be asking ourselves why we want to expose beginners to significantly more risk whilst they only have the resources and knowledge of an elementary small-cap retail investor. We should be encouraging another journey that will teach all the lessons of live trading whilst reducing their risk. We wouldn't encourage a friend to search for a home to buy or rent outside their means, nor would we search for a vehicle that we couldn't afford to run...so why should we trade shares that we can't afford to buy? "To make money!?", you may retort...but think about this, there is a way to trade within our means that will make us money and will reduce our risk exponentially. Is it unreasonable to say that our positions in the market should reflect our knowledge, skill, risk tolerance, and experience?
The best place for beginners to direct their energy is in share trading. The principles of Day Trading can still be applied through Share Trading. You can still develop your DT edge and strategy, you can still set market entry and exit points, you can still trade live. The primary difference being significantly reduced risk. If you treat it as if it was a CFD account you will increase the longevity of your trading journey--potentially all way to your trading goals. This method will aid in building solid risk management, self-control, and strategy implementation.
I am more than happy to explain in greater detail how these set ups would work and operate. I want to see more beginners succeed in the trading world...the ratio of losing traders is far too high and the advice is often too complex.
submitted by wjm2018 to Profitabletrading [link] [comments]

Developing a new strategy, can I please get some opinions from people familiar with VIX hedges

Intro:
I trade CFDs on a MM model, as proof I am not a CFD noob that will destroy my account here is my equity graph with X as trade number and Y as performance in %. The period of obvious change is when I developed my current strategy. I was leveraged 8X long in the March crash and 2X in this weeks one, so my risk control has worked so far, although I took a massive hit to unrealised profits. I have never used a VIX hedge so if anyone has experience with them any help would be great.
https://imgur.com/a/xvoGXtJ

My new plan:
The whole idea is based upon keeping it as simple as possible, whats more simple than S&P longs. In essence the trade is a pyramiding BTFD on SPY with max leverage set at 20X and a VIX hedge.

The Products:
-CFD on the S&P spot price, there is no expiry or rollover. There is however a holding cost of 2.69%PA paid at 1700h NY time.
-CFD on VIX futures contract, furthest out. No holding cost, but expiry will be between 1-2 months depending on entry point.

Position Sizing:
-Entry 1: Long S&P at 1X account value, Long VIX at 1/4 S&P trade value.
The 1/4 comes from this information I found "According to the CBOE Website, on average, the VIX rise 16.8% on days when the S&P 500 index drops 3% or more. This means that if the SPX move down by 10%, the VIX can potentially shoot up by 56%. To play it safe, the fund manager assumes that the VIX will rise by only 40% when the SPX drops by 10%."
https://www.theoptionsguide.com/portfolio-hedging-using-vix-calls.aspx#:~:text=To%20implement%20such%20a%20hedge,known%20as%20the%20reverse%20collar.
-Entry 2: Repeat of entry 1 which is pyramided on top of it. This makes the trade 2X, all subsequent entries will add 1 the leverage amount.

Risk Management:
-Upon entry 2 the 'take profit stop' of entry 1 and the 'stop loss' of entry 2 will be set to a position slightly above break even for the trade, including interest and VIX roll over losses.
-Profit off VIX will be taken in event of a major crash that shuts down the main position.
- In the event of VIX spike >50 VIX may be shorted at an equal level to the long that is open

Entry 1 Rules:
-VIX >28
-S&P retracing
-S&P in uptrend as defined by HHHL in 4h chart
-MACD has convergence between indicator line and price action (shows continued momentum)

Subsequent Entry Rules:
-As per entry 1 rules
-Current position profit >5% of position base value, increasing by 2% for every extra entry

Exit Rules:
-If I hold a strong conviction the market will drop severely
-If max leverage has been reached, close down some profitable positions to increase cash balance which in turn lowers leverage value. This will allow the strategy to continue to grow further.
-Profit on VIX may be taken if: VIX is in profit, has a declining price, and contract expiry >2weeks. The hedge position will then be rolled onto new furthest contract.

I will update this as the thread continues by strike though for removals and italics for admission
submitted by jok178 to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Are there semi-professional brokers that accept European customers

So, I've been searching forever for brokers that:
a) Allow non-UK European accounts
b) Have a platform that's suited to frequent trades with small margins and somewhat complex strategies (e.g. low-to-no commission on a per-trade basis other than the exchange fee, rich APIs + support for more order type than just sell/buy)
c) Have a wide range of instruments available (e.g. allowing for margins on SL order and/or dealing in CFDs, providing options, futures and having those available for stocks, bonds, ETFs, currencies and commodities traded on all major exchanges)
I'm sure these brokers exist for "real" customers that trade millions a day, in my case I have a sort of mid-volume strategy, where I trade e.g. ~20,000$ worht of volume each day (of course, depends on the day, could be between 0 and 50,000$ worth), so I don't have access to those kinds of brokers.
Up until now I've considered/tried:
Are there any other players on the market at the moment?
submitted by elcric_krej to stocks [link] [comments]

BLACK GOLD FLASHES RED AMID OVERSUPPLY CONCERNS

BLACK GOLD FLASHES RED AMID OVERSUPPLY CONCERNS


Crude oil flashes red on the first trading day of the month in response to the oversupply concerns amid surging coronavirus concerns. The OPEC and its allies are about to end the production cut strategy in August that will shoot the supply of black gold in the market. In addition to this, increase in the infection cases around the globe undermines the demand of crude oil in the market. As of now, the US WTI is trading 0.98% lower at $40.03 per barrel, while Brent crude is trading 0.64% lower at $43.34 per barrel.
Talking about the previous session, the crude oil climbed above the $40 mark aided from the news that US oil output cuts were largest on record in May. The oil production plunged from a record 2 million per day barrels to nearly 10 million bpd, as stated by the US Energy Information Administration in its monthly report. However, reports that OPEC+ will abandon production cut measure from August coupled with fears of resurgence in the virus cases capped the gains in the black gold. Hence, crude oil ended the last trading session of July at $40.46 a barrel, slightly up by 0.12%.
Up ahead, investors will remain watchful over coronavirus and Washington-Beijing trade tension headlines to ascertain market direction.
Risk Disclaimer: The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs.
submitted by FXView to FXview [link] [comments]

Your Strategy Could Be As Good!

Hi there everyone. I'm sure like me, a lot of you have been through so many strategies trying to develop our "trader's edge". Like I've shared before my market approach, that alone isn't enough to get one profitable.
Maybe you've tried implementing it and didn't work for you. This brings me to today's rant. Make sure your strategy aligns with the security you're trading. Whether stocks, CFDs or FX, if you're a breakout trader...identify good breakout pairs because not a lot of them break out the same.
If you're a reversal trader, (Harmonic Patterns trader for example) make sure to find a pair that ranges a lot. No use applying this strategy on a trending pair because you'll fail 90% of the time. If you trade trendline channels, a trending pair( I use this a lot with NDX) would be your best solution.
To keep this long rant short, make sure you know which strategy to use for what pair. Also since you're a day trader, know the daily ATR of that pair you choose for your strategy. Have a great weekend, hope you made some pips.
submitted by Naive-Double to Daytrading [link] [comments]

USDCAD TICKS HIGHER AMID RISE IN GREENBACK’S SAFE HAVEN BIDS

USDCAD TICKS HIGHER AMID RISE IN GREENBACK’S SAFE HAVEN BIDS


USDCAD witnessed marginal buying in the early Asian trading hours of Tuesday following appreciation in US dollar due to rise in its safe harbor appeal. The investors are inclined towards greenback amidst increase in the specter of coronavirus cases around the globe that raise concerns regarding re-lockdown strategy to contain the infection. The infection cases have crossed the 18.4 million mark worldwide and approximately 697k deaths have been registered till now. As of now, the currency pair is trading slightly up by 0.02% at 1.3391 level ahead of Canadian Manufacturing PMI data scheduled in the later hours today.
Talking about the last trading session, initially, the currency pair edged higher and touched its intra-day high level of 1.3451 after it mirrored the movement of Dollar Index in the Asian session. However, increase in the prices of crude oil by 0.91% despite OPEC+ eased its record oil production cuts by 2 million barrels per day, bolstered the commodity linked loonie and erased the gains in the pair. Thereby, the currency pair closed the session at 1.3390 level, down by 0.12% on Monday.
Going forward, market participants will remain watchful over Canadian Manufacturing PMI data and US monthly Factory orders data - scheduled to be released later today, to frame their investment decisions.
Risk Disclaimer: The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs.
submitted by FXView to FXview [link] [comments]

USDCAD TRADES LOWER AMID FISCAL STIMULUS

USDCAD TRADES LOWER AMID FISCAL STIMULUS


Extending its two days of negative movement, USDCAD is trading at five weeks low level in the Asian session on Wednesday owing to the optimism surrounding the global economic recovery supported by the strategy of fiscal help by the governments. As of now, the currency pair is trading lower by 0.12% at 1.3442 level.
Talking about the last trading session, the currency pair declined below the level of 1.3450 owing to the broad based weakness in the greenback. The media reports regarding the positive results of clinical trial of covid-19 vaccine developed by AstraZeneca undermined the safe haven appeal of US dollar and bolstered the risk on sentiments among traders. Also, the rise in the prices of crude oil underpinned the commodity linked loonie on Tuesday and, the currency pair culminated the session at 1.3458 level, down by 0.56%.
Going forward, market participants will remain watchful over Canadian monthly CPI data, US monthly HPI and Crude Oil Inventories data - scheduled to be released later today for intraday trading opportunities.
Risk Disclaimer: The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs.
submitted by FXView to FXview [link] [comments]

Best broker/software for day trading/ potentially scalping?

Ive been day trading so far with T212 CFD's, I'm finding it difficult to work with my strategy for two reasons:
The margin seems to be massively biased towards nullifying potential profit and widening at the best point of entry. Often the difference between the buy price and sell price is larger than most peaks on the graph.
Fee free would be great but not essential.
Im not trading a large sum so leverage would be good but having the ability to modify the leverage would be great. I have seen some live trading/scalping where the software allows the small 90% gains that T212 seems designed to remove.
I have a strategy based on support and resistance and trading the breakouts so any suggestions for platforms that support this would be great. Leniency on scalping is essential as well, an issue I have with T212 as I am missing trades because I know I wont be able to hold them for 5 minutes.
submitted by DemonNeutrino to Daytrading [link] [comments]

r/formula1 – I'm an F1 Engineer/Strategist, Ask Me Anything... (pt 2)

Source
Previous post here.
Questions Answers
How many times in a year do you think you get race day strategy 100% correct? I would say we never get it 100% correct. Race day strategy isn't just about picking the correct number of stops and stop laps for both cars.
Did we take every last drop of grip out of the tyres before we pitted? Did we pressure cars ahead the right amount at every point? Did we back off and protect the tyres the right amount at every point? Did we communicate to the driver exactly what we were trying to achieve and therefore get 100% out of them at every instant in the race? Was the modelling accurate and useful? etc. etc.
We will always be searching for marginal/incremental improvements in everything we do.
I’m in high school and am planning on going to school to become a mechanical engineer, so my question is this: how available are engineering jobs in F1, or just motorsport in general? Of course, being an F1 engineer would be a dream, but I have no idea how difficult it would be to actually find a job I have to be honest and say that jobs in motorsport and especially F1 are not plentiful and that they are often oversubscribed many times over.
I would not let that put you off though, at your age you have a lot of time to pick up skills, experiences and knowledge that will help you in the endeavor of getting a job in motorsport.
I would also say that perseverance is almost an essential quality in finding a job in F1. I, and many others I know, were turned down for roles multiple times and at various points thought we would never get our dream jobs in F1.
Hey, Randy! Thanks for doing this awesome AMA. You have talked a lot about getting into F1 for a career as an Engineer. I was hoping you could shed a bit of light in what skillsets/qualifications you look for in candidates who work as the mechanics and the pitstop crew on a given race weekend. Again, Thanks for doing this. I have read through every one of your answers and they were as much fun to read as they were enlightening about the sport we love. So this is not my area of expertise, although I do spend a lot of time working with the pitcrew - so please take this with a pinch of salt but I think below are the main things we look for:
* Some prior experience in building and servicing of race cars or bikes.
* An ability to understand and follow (often complex) procedures.
* A proactive nature (e.g. when reporting faults or build issues).
* Dealing well with a high pressure and time constrained workload and environment.
* An attention to detail and a willingness to learn.
* Ability to read and interpret technical drawings.
* Fabrication and machining skills.
Really cool to hear from you Randy. How have you and the team at McLaren been spending your time with everything that’s been going on with Covid-19? Hope we can see you go racing in Austria in July! So F1 teams have all been subject to an extended "shutdown" meaning that most of us haven't been allowed to work on F1 projects and many of us, consequently, have not been working in recent weeks.
Personally, I've used the time to try and get fit, having averaged c. 4 hours and 15 minutes of exercise every day since April 1st (yes I do have a spreadsheet), as well as trying to learn some new skills like React.
Many of the team have used the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones, which can be difficult with hectic schedules, to improve their cooking skills (I have eaten the best pizza I've ever had during lockdown!), do gardening and so on.
Everyone seems eager to get back to it and most teams will be returning to work over the next fortnight.
Hi Randy. Thanks so much for doing this, the answers so far have been really insightful. Can I ask, as an armchair fan, what can I look for over the course of the weekend to help me predict likely strategic calls on race day? The main 2 factors are tyre behaviour (degradation, wear life and pace difference) and pitstop loss. From here you can get a basic understanding of the strategy before competitors are thrown into the mix.
Pirelli kindly provide some of the information each weekend on tyres and you can estimate the rest from FP2 long runs towards the end of the session. Pitstop loss is also often given by some teams (maybe rounded or slightly noisified - but close enough to give you the right number of stops).
With those 2 things you can work out the baseline strategy if you were racing alone and then you want to be considering the cars that are a pitstop window ahead and behind and see whether you would stop earlier or later than the baseline based on undercutting, traffic and so on.
Thank you so much for doing this AMA! During last year's German GP, I remember that a lot of us fans were interested in contrasting approaches made by two teams as the track started to dry up. One driver saw that the track was dry enough for slicks, called it in, and got the go ahead to take the gamble; he ended up coming very close to a podium. Another driver made similar observations and appealed repeatedly to his engineer to make the switch, but was instructed to stay out for several more laps, costing him points. I understand hindsight is 20/20 here, but if you were the engineer, would you be more inclined to take the driver's word when they potentially contradict the data, or vice versa? Do you believe there's a "correct" approach in situations like these, or a personal preference? Again, thank you so much! (Typed from my “Mclaren Edition” phone...I can't wait for the season to start, and I really wish you guys the best!) Thank you for the kind words!
I think there is a lot you don't see (not your fault) when it comes to strategic decisions, this is amplified many times over in a wet or changeable conditions race, where decisions are extremely difficult, with lots of information, of varying quality/frequency.
I think we have learnt that it depends. Sometimes, we will weight the driver's input higher than anything else, sometimes it will be the least valuable information.
Do you employ many Americans on the team, and if so what does it take? Assuming they have the technical credentials of engineering. So we have nothing against Americans, nor people of other nationalities - having the right to work in the UK is sometimes required although we do also help with visa applications this isn't always possible for us to do.
In terms of Americans on the team, we have Zak Brown, of course and I'll be honest and say I can't think of any others at the moment, although we have had a few placement students in recent years from the United States.
There's no extra requirement for Americans, especially as we're moving to Mercedes powerunits soon, we won't have too many issues with the pronunciation of Renault anymore.
What kind of people do you have in the strategy department? Are they mostly engineers, or like mathematicians and computer scientists? Although we are largely engineers by degree, we don't really discriminate against other backgrounds and are often quite keen to add a diversity of ideas and backgrounds into the mix - a numerate degree is going to be very helpful though.
We are 60% mechanical engineers, 1 engineemathematician hybrid and 1 physicist.
Is it unusual to go from entry-level engineer to head of strategy in 6-7 years? What do you think drove your success? I think it actually happened even a bit quicker than that - which had never been my expectation when I started.
It's hard to say what is unusual, there are so few "race strategists" in the world, let alone in F1 that I think there's not really a "usual" and often timescales can be quite variable based on circumstance (e.g. someone leaving/changing role).
I guess the success is driven by the confidence and belief in the strategy team, of which I am just a part - so the fact that the other members of the team are so good, that management above us let us independently improve and change our processes without blame nor interference etc. is what has really driven it. Also have the much wider strategy team that includes 10s of volunteers to thank - it truly is a team effort and no single person would have the impact they do without the team around them.
Does race strategist cooperate with aerodynamics department in any way? So, I can't go into details but yes we do. Strategy is a really cool role because we end up dealing with pretty much all other areas - as we also cover things like Competitor Intelligence and Sporting matters.
In a more typical sense, just thinking about race strategy, there are a few areas that spring to mind, aerodynamicists and other engineers will be setting things like the wing level and the trades made here can affect performance in qualifying vs. the race, something that we as strategists are well placed to comment on the value of and also for setting cooling levels, we're responsible for weather forecasting and interpretation and so will often liaise with our aerodynamics colleagues about the risks of it being hotter than certain limits.
the below is a reply to the above
Could you unpack a bit on what "competitor intelligence" does? Thanks! "Mr Holmes, I would love to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you."
I'm afraid that in this case the answer is no. All I can say is that we do some pretty neat things using the various kinds of information (audio, video, images, data, quotes, etc.) to gain intelligence on things like relative performance, other teams and so on.
What’s your proudest moment in F1 to date? Another tough one!
What makes me proudest is the Strategy team at McLaren. The team consists of around 5 people at its core and I can honestly say that they are the most talented, motivated, most passionate and smartest collection of individuals I have ever had the pleasure of working with. Everyone's level naturally rises when you work with people of this calibre and although the team is constantly looking for areas of improvement, challenging each other - it is also really just fun. I am very proud that I've played a part in pulling in each of my strategy teammates.
One other thing that gets close (other than Grand Prix which I'll cover in another answer) is Mission Control. McLaren were kind enough to give me the opportunity to manage the project to design a new Mission Control from scratch, build and deploy it. We were responsible for building contractors, ventilation, budget, aesthetic, even unpacking and setting up over 30 machines. The Mission Control room is an awesome facility and we built it together as a team. A lot of it is secret but here's a photo you are allowed to see:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EKssMOfWkAAwPE6?format=jpg&name=large
Hello, Do you go on reddit and check this sub sometimes? I would say more frequently than sometimes and I'm not the only one who works in F1 than does.
The content on here can be amazing at times - from some of the photos, to some of the data visualisations - and sometimes it is just fun to read comments and see how different our perspective of a race/event can be to that of fans.
You've talked about refuelling in a previous answer, and how it might affect strategies, but what is your opinion on the current tyres, and how they basically force the teams to do a two-stop strategy? Would you prefer if the tyres were manufactured in a way that makes them more durable? Thank you! So, I would start by saying the tyres don't force teams into 2 stop strategies, however, the front-runners will have a higher propensity for 2 stops over 1 stops in the current regime, which may present a more skewed picture to fans.
I believe and I think my colleagues and competitors agree, that good racing does involve some strategic flexibility and variety and a good sweet spot is to have races that are at crossover between 2 an 3 stop strategies (crossover means the timings and track position work out such as to be roughly equal).
However, Pirelli are in an unenviable position with regards to giving us tyres that would encourage 2 or 3 stop crossover events, as the drivers also need to be able to push the tyres lap after lap to get good racing.
So you can see that Pirelli have to try and balance both concerns and I think with that in mind they are doing a good job of finding a balance.
The strategy with sainz in Brazil was amazing man Thanks for the kind words but the strategy in Brazil (I hope) was as good as in Austria, or Hungary, etc. We didn't do anything particularly special but in this case the outcome was particularly good - we try and judge ourselves on our decisions/processes/analysis rather than the outcome as the outcome/result can be dependent on chance which is outside our control.
Have you found any books in particular helpful when it comes to the soft skills required working in a multi-department environment, also when it comes to the overarching strategic principles. Building on that, how often do you find yourself acting against the data/conclusions presented to you in favour of your own observations or “common sense” I think the most useful book has been Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix as it really demonstrates the importance of teamwork. Mark Corrigan's seminal "Business Secrets of the Pharaohs" and Michael Scott's "Somehow I Manage" are also essential reading.
Seriously though, a difficult one, I think a lot of skills are picked up outside of books, things like logical problem-solving, being extremely pro-active, etc. however, some books that I find have been useful are:
* Thinking Fast and Slow (almost essential reading, Thinking in Bets is also good)
* The Intelligent Entrepreneur (very inspiring)
* Outliers (to try and replicate some of the factors)
* Legacy (a great book about teamwork and management)
* Resonant Leadership (given to me by manager and a great read)
Speaking from a career standpoint, does having a background in something like biology factor into a possible role at all? Something of a mix of Biology and Engineering (Biomed, Bioengineering etc)? Thanks! It can do - I specialised in Biomedical Engineering as one of my electives in my final year at university, by the way.
Especially in strategy, different viewpoints/experiences/backgrounds can be very useful.
So we're hearing that Austria and maybe Britain is going ahead, is McLaren prepping for this or are they waiting for official word from Formula 1 I can't comment on the calendar as it stands as that would be breaking confidentiality. However, I can say that Liberty and the FIA are working tirelessly to bring a calendar together and it was something that we all discussed yesterday in the Sporting Working Group and is no doubt being discussed on a daily basis in other forums also.
The teams, including McLaren, are trying as well to prepare for the season starting soon whilst remaining flexible such that if there are changes we can adapt to them quickly and well.
How do you judge a mandatory 2 pit stops instead of only one? Can this make the races more enjoyable in your opinion? Thanks I don't think mandatory 2 stop strategies are a good idea. I can talk about this openly as its something we have debated with other teams, the FIA and Liberty as well and as a group we decided against it.
The reason I don't like mandatory 2 stop strategies is that it is artificial and artificial constraints (I believe) will lead to more strange/bad occurrences than good ones.
The benefit of mandatory 2 stop strategies is that everyone will make 2 stops which on average is more stops than we currently do and we believe that more stops (to a limit) typically lead to more exciting races.
However, the downside is that this is purely artificial. If the race is a clear 1 stop and we add a second stop artificially then it's more likely that that stop could be placed in a strange spot, because the sensitivity to its timing could be low - you may see cars pitting very early or late into the race and therefore the race is still like a 1 stop (you don't get the full benefit on racing of the second stop) - especially with a point for fastest lap.
You may then argue that we could force the second stop into a particular window, or set a limit on stint lengths. This also has issues, with cars likely to be concentrated on one side of the window and then there may need to be more artificial constraints.
I very firmly believe that the best way to encourage more stops is to keep constraints on strategists light and influence the primary factors that determine how many stops there are, that is:
* Pitloss (decrease = positive pressure on number of stops).
* Tyre behaviour (worse behaviour = positive pressure on number of stops).
What's it like working for the most positive and happiest team? Let me ask some of my friends at other teams and I'll get back to you soon.
Only kidding 😁 ! I can't say if McLaren is the most positive/happiest team as I've not been everywhere, but its certainly the most fun, positive, happy, smart, etc. etc. team I've ever worked at.
I love it. It's the people that make McLaren (and I know that's a cliche) special and I enjoy working in such a tight-knit, funny, motivated team.
What was the most difficult race strategy wise in your F1 career? My first race, I think stands outs - the 2013 Australian Grand Prix. I started work on January 2nd that year (my first real job in F1), had no strategy experience, had to do lots of winter reporting and had no strategy mentor (as the previous strategist had left already). I'm not sure "baptism of fire" and "thrown into the deep-end" are mixable metaphors but that's what it felt like.
To make matters more "interesting", the data showed and I was convinced that it would be a multiple stop (probably 3 stop) grand prix, based on what we had observed in Winter Testing and during Friday and Saturday running. This was in sharp contradiction to recent history at the Australian Grand Prix - so there were many heated discussions over this (with the majority of the team heavily disagreeing with it being more than a 1 stop race and every member having much more experience than I).
Turns out lack of experience can be an advantage sometimes. Teams tended to do a 2 or 3 stop race, but the latter was much better. Teams were reluctant to add stops given experience and recent history of the Australian Grand Prix and this pushed many into poor strategies, rather than adapting to the tyre behaviour we were observing.
2013 was an interesting year for strategy, with empirical data and lack of bias being really important to getting the strategies right. If you were to look through those races there are certain teams that flip-flopped a lot and others that quickly adapted to the new 'normal'.
Hi Randy, I don't know if this is already over but I'll try anyway. It's no surprise that working in F1 in any capacity must be extremely competitive. Is there any chance for someone considering a career change to be able to get a foot in the door? I work in investment management and realise that I want to be as close to my passion as possible. I'm open to pretty much any job just to get in. Naturally Id hope to have some transferable skills but i would focus on the chance to build skills and potentially go from there. Any advice? Thanks! I think perseverance and desire are key and yes it is possible. Coincidentally, I was working in the investment industry when I was offered the chance to take a full time role in strategy for the 2013 season.
I had worked at Williams for my final year project at university, but had been "out of the game" for a couple years when I got the offer to return.
Hello Randy, I am sorry if this has already been asked. But I would like to know your thoughts on: The new strategy involved on the new regulations/ground affect designs on the new Formula 1 vehicles? Is this a step in the right direction? Love to hear an professional / insider view on these new changes to the sport as the team Engineers do not seem to have a big say in the acceptace of the design limitations from FIA. I personally think the new regulations (Sporting, Technical and Financial) are moving the sport in the right direction and so am looking forwards to them being introduced over the coming years.
I would also say, as it may not be obvious to fans, that teams and engineers are heavily involved in these regulations. Whether that is us helping to draft parts of them, sense check them, vote on them, etc. it is a very open, constructive forum between the teams, the FIA and FOM (and other external experts as required).
Day 5: Mr. Singh is still answering questions. He's now one of us. LEGEND, and thanks to McLaren for allowing this. -Best AMA yet? DCanswered4questions. Haha thank you!
I will probably have to stop soon - but have a few more answers coming on a few families of question I haven’t yet answered. 🙂
Hi, Randy, Your answers are great, thank you! One of my most favorite McLaren performances of recent years was Fernando's insane race in Azerbaijan in 2018, when he had a double tyre puncture but still managed to finish 7th. Were you still his personal strategist back then? What was your role in his success? What were you thoughts when you saw him limping to the pits on two wheels? What did you do after that? What a race, eh? "Personal" strategist, you make us sound like mathematical butlers... 😁.
I wasn't Fernando's strategist at that time, Chris (one of our team) had already taken over by then and I was leading the team. It was not an easy race, although it may look like we sat back and watched, there's a lot of decisions made that you don't see and a lot of decisions made not to do stuff.
It was a good team effort from everyone to stay calm and try and pick up the pieces after the incident on the first lap, when the car rolled into the pits we did consider retiring it - but as a famous paper salesman once said "you miss 100% of the shots you don't take". What outsiders (who get special access) often notice is that the team stays calm, you can't get wobbly or excited over the incident/accident, you need to be calm, methodical and logical.
Great ama I think this is my favourite question so far. 😀
To be honest, the questions are very interesting and I have had so many people answer questions for me when I was in the position of being a fan/student and that changed my life by helping me get my dream job. If I can give back a fraction of the help/information I've received then I'll feel very happy!
How contagious is Landos laugh? I don't know about you but I find it quite grating. Do you know the feeling you get when you hear someone scratch their nails across a blackboard, or when your alarm goes off and you're still tired?
In all seriousness though, Lando is a funny guy and does always keep the mood nice and light.
Hi Randy. Who is your favourite member of the IT team? Sincerely, Definitely not a member of the IT team. Trick question! I don't have a favourite member of the IT team. 😁
Is there any role for physicians/doctors on race teams? As doctors, I would probably say no. Most teams won't employ their own doctors anymore or will do so in a very limited capacity.
However, that doesn't mean we don't have medical support, it tends to come through external organisations that support F1, such as Formula Medicine, for example, or the FIA's Medical Programme.
We also occasionally get applications for strategists who have a medical background - and that isn't something we look down upon, if anything it may provide a skillset/experiences that would be complementary to those of 'mostly engineers'.
I understand you may not answer because this may be sensitive, but Which method of steering the ship do you think is more effective ? The steely dictatorial grip of Ron Dennis or the More lenient managerial approach of Zak brown ? From a fan perspective, I love that mclaren drivers aren’t on such a tight leash. I never really worked under Ron as I joined in mid-2015. I have to say that the management style I’ve experienced throughout has been great - no blame culture, very open and understanding, letting the experts make decisions, etc.
Have you ever sat on the pitwall at the start and said (even to yourself) "And it's lights out and away we go."? I haven’t! I imagine I now will at whichever Grand Prix we get the pleasure of starting first this year.
Is Ferrari’s strategy as much of a running joke in the paddock as it is by the fans and here on reddit? Maybe you can’t really answer that truthfully but I’ve always been curious. It’s obviously a difficult job but I do wonder if they shoot themselves in the foot as often as it seems from the fans perspective. Answered elsewhere in the thread.
It's a difficult, stressful job, so you always have respect for your competitors.
In your experience, would adding flame decals to my truck make it go faster? Where are you going to place them? What colour are the flames?
Hey randy, i am a 15 year old girl who lives in india and my dream is to become a formula one engineer or work in f1 in anyway. What do u think are the educational qualifications needed to become a formula 1 engineer and what exposure do u think i need to even be close to full filling my dream. I have been following mclaren f1 team for quite some while now and love the friendly environment inside the team. As PapaKeth says, hopefully there are some answers to your question about what qualifications are required in my other comments.
Can I say though, don't let being 15, female, or living in India deter you - none of those things are a blocker to getting a job in F1 in the future.
Hi ! Thank you for answering some of our questions ! I've been wanting to ask, in the event of a car failure ( engine failure, hydraulics failure, etc) how do you become aware of it ? Do you have a real time data link to the car as an engineer ? Or is it something you see on a TV ? So we get data from the cars "live", there are hundreds of sensors on each car and this data is transmitted to us at the track and we also transmit it back to HQ in Woking. There are tens of people looking at the data and typically we will spot problems in the data, or based on feedback from the drivers, before we see them on TV.
That doesn't mean that we never spot stuff on TV first - sometimes you don't have instrumentation for certain things and so you may spot it visually first and the TV feed is a good way of sense-checking in some cases as well.
Do you think Stoffel deserved to still be in F1? (Not necessarily with McLaren) 100% - he is a great talent and I'm very glad that he is doing so well in Formula E.
Hi, thanks for doing this Q&A. Working for an F1 team is the dream, though I understand it's very difficult to get in. I'm disabled, would this matter to an employer? Do you have any advice on how I could approach this to someone as I'm just finishing my first year at University and hoping to apply for internships. Also, (sorry if you've answered this question already) I am studying Mathematics probably going to move into Mathematics and Statistics. Would it be possible to apply for a strategist position with a Mathematics degree? Your disability should not matter to an employer and I really believe it will not. We have people with disabilities working at McLaren. Perhaps if it is something you are concerned about or if its a disability that a team (or McLaren) could help make easier to manage (apologies if my wording is not sensitive) then I would highlight that in your application when you apply for a role.
Mathematics is entirely sensible as a background for a strategist role. I started off in Mathematics (& Statistics) before I moved over to Engineering (I found Mathematics at university to be too abstract for my liking). If you are doing Statistics anything that covers stochastic modelling would be particularly relevant to strategy.
I want to work in F1 in the future and preferably an engineer role. Would studying Mechanical Engineering be the best course to get a chance? Thanks I would say the majority of F1 engineers have studied Mechanical Engineering but that doesn't necessarily equate to it giving you the best chance of getting in. Engineering skills (and particularly mechanical engineering skills) will make you suitable for a multitude of roles in an F1 team (from strategy, to design engineering, to race engineering and performance analysis), so naturally you would expect more mechanical engineers.
I would have a think about the role that you would like to do and what qualifications would give you the best chance for that role, it could be that its Computer Science instead, or Aerodynamics, or maybe it is Mechanical Engineering. I would also think heavily about how interested you are in said degree - a degree is not a small investment of time, money and effort and its important you do something you enjoy.
the below is a reply to the above
Hey Randy, this answer was not directed at me but I just want to let you know it really just helped me out. I recently dropped out of mechanical engineering because I wasn't enjoying it and made the switch to computer science. It really pained me for a while thinking about giving up the F1 dream because my career choice wasn't ideal for me. So yeah, thanks. While I'm at it I'd like to add a question about computer science in an F1 team, what kind of roles could I take part of with that degree (specificaly at the track, though I see how that's a bit less likely)? Are there masters degrees or specializations more sought after in certain areas? Again, thanks a lot for you time in answering these questions and apologies for the bad english 😅 Hi, no worries and thank you for the appreciation.
Computer Science is a numerate enough degree at most places that you could lend yourself to any role as long as you can pick up the required engineering knowledge as well. Obviously, something in areas like Software Engineering, IT or Vehicle Science/Modelling may be most relevant/easy but there aren't necessarily many trackside opportunities in those areas.
Hello, First of all, thanks for answering all those questions. It's nice for us students dreaming of F1 to have something to look up to. So I am studying mechanical engineering in France and I am really looking forward to become a Motorsport Race engineer, and obviously F1 would be the dream. What I like the lost in that job is the trackside aspect, travelling, living the race. As I imagine, you need some years of experience to become a trackside F1 engineer. So do you think building experience in lower formulas like F2/F3, FE, or prototypes, GT...as performance/data engineer in smaller teams is a good way to line up for a trackside job in F1 ? Or is it recomended to start as an engineer at the lowest level directly in F1 and try to climb the ladder from there ? What is the proportion of your trackside colleagues that come from other motorsport categories ? Thanks ! Great - I look forward to working with you, or competing against you in the future!
That's a tough one. I wouldn't say trackside experience, per se, is very highly desired for trackside roles, but rather a demonstration of the deep technical/operational knowledge, the ability to deal with stress, etc. that makes people successful in those roles.
For this reason, I would say it's better to be in an F1 team and then attempt to try and go trackside, than to be trackside in a 'lower' formula.
The data, from my experience, suggests the same, the vast majority of engineers are in F1 first and then go trackside, rather than being trackside outside of F1 and moving to be trackside in F1.
That is not to say that experience in 'lower' formulae is not immensely useful to securing a job in F1 (just, I believe less preferred than F1 experience).
[deleted] We have - and not just sports too.
We have met with data scientists from football teams, coaches from the Olympics, rugby teams and professional cyclists - as well as many engineers and drivers from other motorsport series.
We also try and keep learning by working with partners or contacts across the military and commercial fields also.
the below is a reply to the above
Can you expand on the military part? Only at a high level, I'm afraid - as I wouldn't want to give anything away to others.
One area that I can talk about is that many teams will use military or ex-military experts to coach/train/share ideas with their personnel as there is a lot of overlap (as there is with many commercial fields also). So, for example, the military practice high quality communications on a regular basis, in highly stressful/pressured situations - that's an area where many teams have worked with ex-RAF personnel, for example, to share best practice, to coach and teach personnel and to improve processes.
Hi Randy My question is, if there's for example safety car deployed and the decision whether pit or not have to be made quickly, can the race engineer and the driver make a decision without asking you? They can but they shouldn't and I can't think of an occasion when they have.
Strategy decisions are made by the strategy team (not necessarily by me) and we have processes in place for making decisions where we have lots of time (normally measured in minutes), down to decisions where we may have 2 or 3 seconds to decide what to do for both cars and execute the communications/actions to do it.
Sometimes we may pre-make the decision and sometimes we have to make it on the fly or override our original intent - the thing about safety cars is that the cause of them can often change your variables/strategy.
Can you speak on how the sport has changed in the past few years in aspect to big data. How has data gathering and manipulation changed the sport? Specifically when it comes to making decisions based on past and current strategies. What kind of software and hardware have made the biggest changes, and how do you see the future of F1 benefit from AI/Big-data? Thanks for any info you may be able to share. McLaren have always been data-driven, so things haven't changed too much recently. We are finding better ways to analyse the data we have and to draw insights from it. I'm afraid I can't say too much more.
Why is it that you still see signs being held out to the drivers at the pit wall? Surely there can’t be anything said on these signs which can’t be said over the car radio? There’s gonna be a simple answer id imagine. I’ve always thought that it would be hard to try read a sign while travelling at 200 mph? It happens so rarely nowadays but the radio can fail, so the pitboards are a backup for that. The drivers should always give them a look as they go past (and they rarely do!) in case the radio has failed.
In the current times, where radio is public to other teams they could also be used as a way of passing coded messages, but we do watch them and that doesn't seem to be the case.
Hey Randy! Big fan of your work last season! My question is: Other than focusing on optimising strategy through the various instruments you have for every next race, what portion of your work is dedicated to improving the tools you have to work out strategies, or developing new technologies and methods? Is this something done consistently or over the winter? And lastly, how much does McLaren Applied work with you in using the newer tools in their work? Thanks :) Thank you.
With how busy the season is, often it is difficult to spend too much time doing development in the season, so big projects are typically tackled over the Winter period between seasons (although this is also getting compressed).
However, we are constantly, both in race weekends and between, developing our analysis techniques, smaller pieces of software, our understanding of competitors' behaviours, etc. so there is a constant ongoing development battle.
We do work with McLaren Applied fairly frequently across the business - we're not currently doing that on strategy projects.
the below question has been split into two, enumerated
Hi, thanks for doing this AMA! I've spent a lot of time reading your answers!I don't know if you'll answer this too but I'll try asking something anyway 1. What are the possible roles that a computer science graduate could cover? Hi! If you wanted to be very computer science focused, I guess software engineering, IT and some of the compute type roles would be interesting. If you're willing to pick up engineering knowledge then things like Vehicle Science modelling and CFD can open up too.
2. What are the main languages/frameworks used in the F1 enviroment?
3. Are you worried about Daniel coming next year? I mean, probably it will be hard not to laugh for the entire week-end when he's with Lando! Thanks in advance, totally not a computer science student.
Hi Randeep, first of all, thanks for your deep insights into the world of Formula 1 and McLaren. My question to you is, how do McLaren (or any other F1 team for that matter) ensure a stable electrical power supply in the case of a loss of normal power supply (Diesel Generators/UPS/battery banks) at both the factory and less likely to occur but still possible, at the track? Bonus question; how do teams (McLaren) prepare for different types of electrical outlets, voltages and currents all around the world? To start - I’ll say I’m not an electrician - take the below with a pinch of salt.
Most teams will have generators at the track (actually various kinds - to run stuff on the grid, in the trucks at European events and external ones at fly away races) and some kind of UPS system as well. Power supplies at circuits can be ‘temperamental’ and often there are power outages for specific reasons too.
In terms of for electrical outlets - we as end users just bring our UK stuff and plug it in! There’s an electrician and IT team who ensure that everything is set up and good to go and sneak with different voltage, phase, etc. supplies.
How did it feel to be part of mclaren last year? Like it has been in an incredible year with outstanding results. I have to say, I have enjoyed every year at McLaren and I started in 2015 when the results weren't outstanding - I am working with really awesome people and even through the bad times it is great to see the team spirit that pervades through everyone.
Last year was incredible and it's good to get an upswing in performance and to see teammates celebrating the thick after making it through the thin!
Who won the bet where Lando had to have ur face as his lock screen till Abu Dhabi last year? Lando won the bet, but he also clearly has no shame. 😃
submitted by 500scnds to tabled [link] [comments]

Haven't you started your first transaction yet? Bityard will explain everything you need to know.

Haven't you started your first transaction yet? Bityard will explain everything you need to know.
In 2020, Bitcoin ushered in the third halving. Many people predicted that the Bitcoin price would be raising again, and yes, it reached the mark of $10,000 on June 2nd, and the price once stood at 10,444 US dollars, becoming a hot spot in the currency circle. Search news, and soon fell 870 US dollars within 15 minutes to 9,720 US dollars, fluctuations attracted many people's attention.
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For new investors:
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You don’t need to much money to buy Bitcoins
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Bityard Exchange provides a simulated trading service. Before starting a formal transaction, you can continue to practice using the demo trading, and then put into actual trading after you get started.

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Bityard's platform is a complete, global compliance system to protect our users. In other words, Bityard’s risk prevention system has established a strong position with the consent and approval of the relevant regulatory authorities.
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For your safety, Bityard has account double authentication, permanent anonymity, multiple offline signatures, deep cold storage assets and other settings to ensure the security of user account and we also takes full advance payment. For new users who are not yet familiar with risk management, under strict control of risks, investors' relative trust in the platform is relatively established.
Finally, Bityard reminds new users the importance of private keys, private keys, as the name implies, is the key to open their own assets. Once lost, the bitcoin stored in the wallet will not be recovered, so be careful and take good care of yours.
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submitted by bityardadmin to u/bityardadmin [link] [comments]

Are there semi-professional brokers that accept European customers

So, I've been searching forever for brokers that:
a) Allow non-UK European accounts
b) Have a platform that's suited to frequent trades with small margins and somewhat complex strategies (e.g. low-to-no commission on a per-trade basis other than the exchange fee, rich APIs + support for more order type than just sell/buy)
c) Have a wide range of instruments available (e.g. allowing for margins on SL order and/or dealing in CFDs, providing options, futures and having those available for stocks, bonds, ETFs, currencies and commodities traded on all major exchanges)
I'm sure these brokers exist for "real" customers that trade millions a day, in my case I have a sort of mid-volume strategy, where I trade e.g. ~20,000$ worht of volume each day (of course, depends on the day, could be between 0 and 50,000$ worth), so I don't have access to those kinds of brokers.
Up until now I've considered/tried:
Are there any other players on the market at the moment?
submitted by elcric_krej to Trading [link] [comments]

Just got this overly obvious scam email...

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submitted by tech510 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Making the jump: how to leave day job and concentrate on trading instead

Hi everyone...
I've been thinking about this topic for a while now but never really addressed it with some serious thought.
Currently I'm employed full time by a consulting firm and it's a nice job indeed (well payed, nice benefits, great colleagues, soon-to-become junior partner). Nevertheless I still feel it doesn't tick all the boxes for me:
That said, I'm starting to think a regular job will never fit with these requirements and I'm looking at alternatives: this is where trading comes in. I've been interested in trading for a few years now and my current situation on the topic is the following:
On one end I feel if only I could have enough time to focus and concentrate on this I think I might be successful, on the other end not I'm well aware I could easily lose all my money and the uncertainty of the income scares me.
As of now, I'm defining something that resambles a plan to jump ship and it looks like the following:
  1. Define starting capital i need before quitting my job (probably around 20k€ for the markets + 5k€ as rainy days fund)
  2. Define how much I need to make each month to survive and keep on trading (somewhere between 1.5k€/2k€ at least)
  3. Define "point of no return" (how much of said capital I'm ok to burn before reverting back to searching for a regular job)
  4. Feasibility check
  5. Define exit plan from current job
So, in order to converge to a conclusion, I need advice from people that may have found themeselves in my same spot. How did you make the jump? How did you cope with fear and uncertainty? How did you prepare to switch? Is there something major I'm missing?
Thanks for all your feedbacks!
submitted by iig560745 to Trading [link] [comments]

Stocks vs CFD

So I am quite new to trading. I've always wanted to invest and I feel the current market is a good opportunity to get into it and make some money and learn the ropes for the future.
So far I have just invested in stocks and made a little bit of money selling everything off before good friday. I dont have huge capital (around £6000) so my profits obviously arent massive. However, I have been researching CFD (I live in the UK) and whilst I understand that with leverage comes greater risk I feel like I should invest in CFD to make a greater profit.
One thing I came across was that to hold a CFD overnight a charge is incurred and I don't think I would be very good at day trading as it seems much more of a gamble.
Does anyone have any advice on whether CFDs are a good idea. If so, is the holding charge significant? Also, what strategies do people employ when dealing with CFDs? Am I missing something entirely and do you think I should stick with stocks?
Any help will be greatly appreciated.
submitted by ferrerorocher997 to investing [link] [comments]

LOONIE GAINS STRENGTH AMID RISE IN PRICES OF CRUDE OIL

LOONIE GAINS STRENGTH AMID RISE IN PRICES OF CRUDE OIL


USDCAD reverses its initial gains in the Asian session on Monday following broad based USD weakness and improvement in the prices of crude oil. The limited supply strategy by the major oil producers bolsters the prices of black gold which underpins the commodity linked loonie. As of now, the currency pair is trading lower by 0.15% at 1.3582 level.
The currency pair witnessed two way price movements on the last trading day of the week. Initially, the pair declined owing to the positive market sentiments coupled with increase in the prices of crude oil. However, in the late American hours, the greenback bounced following the downbeat Canadian Retail Sales data. The prints showed that retail sales in the Canadian economy nosedived to -22% much less than anticipated that weighed on the loonie. Thus, pair culminated the session slightly higher by 0.04% at 1.3604 level.
Going forward, market participants will remain watchful over US Home Sales data and speech by BOC Governor Macklem– scheduled for later hours in a day, for intraday trading opportunities.
Risk Disclaimer: The vast majority of retail client accounts lose money when trading in CFDs.
submitted by FXView to FXview [link] [comments]

Game-Changing Trading Strategy  How To Day Trade Stocks ... Best Day Trading Strategies - YouTube CFD Trading Strategies for Beginners CFD Trading Strategies CFD Trading Strategy Example-Day Trading Strategy for CFD Trading

Day trading is the act of buying and selling a financial instrument within the same day or even multiple times over the course of a day. Taking advantage of small price moves can be a lucrative For CFD specific day trading tips and strategies, see our CFD page. Regional Differences. Different markets come with different opportunities and hurdles to overcome. Day trading strategies for the Indian market may not be as effective when you apply them in Australia. For example, some countries may be distrusting of the news, so the market If you are not yet convinced that day trading with CFDs is not the best right now, stick to the end of this article, since we’ll talk about three reasons to take it into account. Market uncertainty For the first time in a century, the world has to deal with a global pandemic and most of the countries had proven to be unprepared in the face of Day Trading Methods. After trading with my CFD day trading plan, I have by now a very strong feel for day trading, and am looking to formulate strategies to extract consistent profits from the market. I am attempting here to share my experiences with my fellow traders. First of all, I must tell you what you need to be a successful day trader. There’s a fairly good reason for why CFD trading is trending nowadays, as it is one of the most secure methods to earn returns – but at the same time, it is also difficult to understand. You need to have a proper understanding of the strategies, the methods – and pretty much everything needed to maintain a decent return.

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Game-Changing Trading Strategy How To Day Trade Stocks ...

This is a broad overview of CFD trading strategies. How do you go about trading CFDs? ... Day Trading Strategies for Beginners: Class 1 of 12 - Duration: 55:18. Warrior Trading 7,079,916 views. 55:18. Discover a proven day trading pivot points strategy that will improve your results when day trading or swing trading the Forex or stock market. The most succ... In this presentation we look at some top tips from successful CFD traders. Rule 1: Build a trading pyramid Rule 2: Avoid entering your entire position at one price Here is the best day trading strategy for beginner traders in the stock market! 1.🚨Techbuds FB Group: http://bit.ly/techbudsfbgroup 2. 📈Full A-Z Beginner Day... Start Your Day Trading Journey Today. Register for My FREE Webinar & Receive My Best Selling Book: https://warrior.app/day-trade-workshop If you have ANY que...

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